Thursday, 30 September 2010

6031 Pte Willis Ormerod, 5th Bn, York & Lancs Regt

6031 Private Willis Ormerod of the 5th Battalion, York & Lancaster Regiment, died of wounds in England on the 30th September 1916. He had previously served with the West Riding Regiment (number 5449). At the time of his enlistment at Halifax, Willie was living in Todmorden. He was 26 years old, the son of Mrs Sarah Ormerod, of 106 Burnley Road Todmorden, and he is buried in St Paul's Church Cemetery at Cross Stone, Yorkshire.

Surviving service papers show that Willis was conscripted into the 3/4th Battalion, West Riding Regiment on the 4th April 1916, was posted to the 1/4th Battalion on the 11th August that year, and was transferred to C Company of the 1/5th York & Lancs Regiment on the 3rd September.

Papers dating to September 1920 reveal that Willis was unmarried and that his father was John Marshall - address unknown. Willis had no full blood brothers or sisters but did have four half brothers: John Arthur Ormerod, Greenwood Ormerod, Albert Ormerod and Ernest Ormerod; all of these men in their thirties and forties by September 1920.

Willis was wounded on the 20th September 1916 (gunshot wound to the spine) and after spending time at the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station and the 13th General Hospital in Boulogne, was transferred to England aboard the St Omer Hospital Ship on the 25th. He died at the Norfolk War Hospital five days later; the cause of death noted as septicaemia and heart failure.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 29 September 2010

L/9782 Pte Henry Pellett, 2nd Bn, Royal Sussex Regt

L/9782 Private Henry Pellett of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment was killed in action on the 29th September 1914. He was born in Stone, Kent and enlisted at Chichester on the 3rd November 1911. De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour notes that he was the son of James Pellett of Stone Ferry, although the Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds no additional personal information.

Surviving papers in the WO 363 series note that Henry originally joined the Territorials. On the 29th October 1910 he joined the 5th (Cinque Ports) Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment at Rye and was given the number 1271. His stated age was 17 years and his trade was farm labourer. He remained with the Territorials until the 3rd August the following year when, now aged 18 years and six months, he joined the 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion, also at Rye. He was given a new number: 1419. During his time with the Territorial Force he completed two weeks' annual training at Hassocks in July. His father is also noted on his papers as his next of kin with an address at Church Cottages, Stone Ferry.

Henry was reported missing in action on the 29th September and later confirmed as killed on this day. His body was recovered and he now lies in Vendresse British Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 28 September 2010

Loos - Day 4 - L/6559 Pte Frederick Goldsack, 2nd Bn, The Buffs

L/6559 Private Frederick Goldsack of the 2nd Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment), was killed in action on the 28th September 1915; one of nearly a thousand British officers and men to die on this day. He was born in St Margaret's, Dover, was living in Dover at the time of his enlistment, and joined the regiment at Canterbury in March 1901.

Frederick - or probably, 'Fred' - was born in 1884, his birth registered in Kent in the June quarter of that year. He arrived in France on the 17th January 1915. Like so many Loos casualties, Frederick Goldsack has no known grave and is, like Walter Godman (KiA 27th September), John Bramwell (DoW 26th September), and Jack Young (KiA 25th September), commemorated on the Loos Memorial. Their sacrifice is not forgotten.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 27 September 2010

Loos - Day 3 - 21545 Pte Walter Godman, 4th Bn, Grenadier Guards

21545 Private Walter Godman of the 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards was killed in action on the 27th September 1915; less than six weeks after he'd arrived in France. He was born in Islington and enlisted in London in January 1915. He was the son of Charles and Ellen Godman of 44 Etherley Road, West Green, London and was just 19 years old at the time of his death. Like so many Loos casualties, Walter has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 26 September 2010

Loos - Day 2 - 16488 Pte John Bramwell, 10th Bn, York & Lancs Regt

16488 Private John Bramwell of B Company, the 10th Battalion, York & Lancs Regiment, died of wounds on the 26th September 1915. He was born in Fir Vale, Sheffield and enlisted at Sheffield on the 8th November 1914. He was a miner by trade, 37 years old.

Originally posted to the the regimental depot, he was transferred to the 10th Battalion on the 13th November.

Reported wounded and missing on the 26th September, this was subsequently updated to "died of wounds between the 26th and 29th September" and later acknowledged that he died of wounds on the 26th.

At the time of his death he was 38 years old. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 25 September 2010

Remembering Loos - S/12216 Cpl Jack R Young, 5th Bn, Cameron Highlanders

Nearly 10,000 British Army officers and men died on this, the opening day of the Battle of Loos: 25th September 1915. Today, on the 95th Anniversary of this battle, I remember one man of many: Corporal Jack Young.

S/12216 Corporal Jack Young was serving with the 5th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders when he was killed in action. He was born in Steyning, Sussex but was living in Glasgow and enlisted there in September 1914. He was an original member of the 5th (Service) Battalion and arrived in France on the 10th May 1915.

Jack was lost within the opening minutes or hours of the battle, reported missing at the end of the day's events and never seen again. His body - or at last identifiable remains - was never recovered, and he is one of over 20,000 men commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 24 September 2010

6405 Pte Charles W Nippress, 1st Bn, Wilts Regt

6405 Private Charles William Nippress of the 1st Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment died of wounds on the 24th September 1914. He was born in Wiltshire, was living in Birmingham and enlisted at Swindon in the second half of 1903. He was almost certainly on the reserve when war was declared and he arrived overseas in France on the 31st August 1914. He was the husband of Elsie Kate Nippress, of 1, Lowe St., Camp Hill, Birmingham and she later applied for her late husband’s medals. He is buried in Les Gonards Cemetery at Versailles.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

28799 Pte Richard Airey, 7th Bn, East Lancs Regt

28799 Private Richard Aire of the 7th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment, was killed in action on the 23rd September 1917. He was born in Blackburn and was still living there when he enlisted. He was 31 years old, the son of Mrs Martha Airey of 46 Primrose Terrace, Mill Hill, Blackburn, and the husband of Elizabeth Alice Airey of 30 Vale Street, Blackburn. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial at Passchendaele.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 22 September 2010

39940 Pte Montague T Cawsey, 2nd Bn, Welsh Regt

39940 Private Montague Thomas Cawsey of the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, was killed in action on the Somme on the 22nd September 1916. He was born in Bideford, was living in Blackwood (Devon) and enlisted at Bargoed. He has no known grave and is commemorated on thee Thiepval Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 21 September 2010

10085 Pte John Cottrill, 2nd Bn, Worcs Regt

10085 Private John Cottrill of the 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action on the 21st September 1914. He was born in Birmingham, was living in Birmingham and enlisted at Worcester in August or September 1906. He arrived overseas on the 26th August 1914.

John Cottrill was 26 years old, the son of John Cottrill of Trafalgar Place, Tillingham Street, Birmingham. He is buried in Vendresse British Cemetery on the Aisne in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 20 September 2010

25501 Pte Sam Jessop, 8th Bn, Lincs Regt

25501 Private Sam Jessop of B Company, the 8th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, died on the 20th September 1918. He was a Nottinghamshire man, born in Worksop, living in Mansfield and enlisting at Retford in June 1916. He was the son of John and Elizabeth Jessop of 45 Norfolk Street, Worksop. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds that he was a native of Bothamsall, Notts. He is buried in Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 19 September 2010

L/8126 Sgt Zebulum Barden, 1st Bn, RWK

L/8126 Sergeant Zebulum Barden of the 1st Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment, was killed in action on the 19th September 1914. He was a long-serving soldier who was born at Deptford in 1887 and enlisted at New Cross around September 1905. He arrived in France on the 15th August 1914 and is commemorated on the La Ferte sous Jouarre Memorial in France. There is a marriage recorded for a Zebulum Barden in 1939 and this is probably his son.

In February 1910, Sergeant Barden's memorial plaque and letter of condolence were offered for sale on eBay with a starting price of 70 pounds. Chat in the RWK forum noted that, "Sergeant Barden was killed near the village of Missey during a artillery barrage on the road during a wet and rainy day. He was killed alongside Sergeant Fitzgerald and Sergeant Warnett, all three belonging to B Company." The 1911 census has him at the RWK depot in Maidstone as a 24-year-old single lance-sergeant; a rivet carrier by trade.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 18 September 2010

S/15211 Rfm Edward G Hoare, 11th Bn, Rifle Brigade

Eight hundred and forty-eight British officers and men died on the 18th September 1916. S/15211 Rifleman Edward George Hoare of the 11th Battalion, The Rifle Brigade, was killed in action on this date. He was a south Londoner, born in Walworth, living in East Dulwich and enlisting at Camberwell, probably around the 7th or 8th February 1916, judging by his army number number. He was 25 years old, the son of Charles and Emily Hoare of 174 Dunstan's Road, East Dulwich, London.

Edward Hoare has no known grave and is commemorated on the vast and imposing Thiepval Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 17 September 2010

193 Rfm William Owen 2nd Bn, KRRC

193 Rifleman William Owen of the 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, died on the 17th September 1914. He was killed in action and, having no known grave, is commemorated on the La Ferte sous Jouarre Memorial in France.

Wiliam was born in Peckham and living in Brixton when he enlisted. He was overseas by the 13th August 1914 and his number either dates to a regular enlistment in April 1897 or to enlistment in the 5th (Special Reserve) or 6th (Extra Reserve) Battalion in early August 1914. Either way, William would certainly have had prior military service under his belt to have been sent to France so soon after war was declared.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 16 September 2010

Lt Charles E Moulton, 6th Bn, Wiltshire Regt

Lieutenant Charles Eric Moulton of the 6th Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 16th September 1915. He was 26 years old, the son of John and Alice Blanche Moulton, of The Hall, Bradford-on-Avon. John Moulton would have been around 75 years old when his son was killed. He was a JP and seriously wealthy. The 1911 census shows Charles (aged 21) living with his parents, and waited on by a footman, cook, maid, two housemaids and a kitchenmaid. Charles is buried in Brown's Road Military Cemetery at Festubert.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Officers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
1911 Census

Wednesday, 15 September 2010

10980 Pte John Finan, 1st Bn, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt)

10980 Private John Finan of the 1st Battalion, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment), was killed in action on the 15th September 1914. He was born in St Anne's, Lancashire and enlisted at Ashton-under-Lyne in late July or early August 1913. He'd therefore only be a regular soldier for just over a year when Britain went to war. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds no additional information other than that he is commemorated on the La Ferte sous Jouarre Memorial in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 14 September 2010

240453 Pte Michael McGarragan, 2/5th Bn, KOYLI

240453 Private Michael McGarragan of the 2/5th Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, was killed in action on the 14th September 1917. He was 28 years old, the son of James and Mary McGarragan, and he is buried in Favreuil British Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 13 September 2010

8656 Pte Frederick G Newton, 2nd Bn, HLI

8656 Private Frederick George Newton of the 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, died on the 13th September 1914. He was born in Kensington, a cook by trade, and he joined the HLI in London in late June 1903. At the time of his death he was 28 years old and married (in February 1909) to Fanny Newton (nee Jennings). The couple lived at 193 Victoria Dock Road, Custom House, London with their three children, the youngest of these just a few months old when Frederick went to war.

Pages from Frederick's service record survive in the WO 363 series at the National Archives. This shows that he was transferred to the Army Reserve on the 26th June 1906 (having originally attested for three years with the colours and nine on the reserve) and that he was subsequently mobilized on the 5th August 1914. He was posted missing on the 13th September and later assumed, for official purposes, to have died on that day. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the La Ferte sous Jouarre Memorial in France. CWGC gives his age at death as 28 and yet the age stated on his 1903 attestation papers notes that he was 20 years and three months old at the time of his enlistment.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 12 September 2010

Capt Archibald B Priestley, 1st Bn, Dorset Regt

Captain Archibald Bertram Priestley of the 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment died of wounds on the 12th September 1914. He had certainly served with the Dorsets since at least 1911 as he appears on the 1911 census with his regiment in Dorchester. He is noted as a 28 year-old lieutenant; single and born in London.

Captain Priestley's medal index card notes that he arrived in France on the 22nd August 1914. He was married by this stage and his widow would later (November 1917) apply for his 1914 Star. Three addresses are given on the reverse of the medal index card. The first of these is 7 Nelson Gardens, Stoke, Devonport. Mrs Priestley's address is noted as Cowslip Cottage, Mickleham, Surrey, and the medals were finally sent to 26 Edith Road, West Kensington, London W14. Archibald Priestley is one of 31 Commonwealth casualties buried in Coulommiers Communal Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

85222 Pte Geoffrey S Lowey, 2/7th Bn, King's

85222 Private Geoffrey Sutherland Lowey of the 2/7th Battalion, King's (Liverpool Regt), was killed in action on the 11th September 1918. Private Lowey was born in Peel, Isle of Mann and enlsited at Seaforth, Lancashire. He was 27 years old, the son of James and Annie Lowey and the husband of Phyllis A Lowey of Duke Street, Peel. He is buried in Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 10 September 2010

1824 Pte Harry K Liversedge, 6th Bn, King's (Liverpool Regt)

1824 Private Harry Kinder Liversedge of the 6th Battalion, King's (Liverpool Regiment), died at home on the 10th September 1914. He was born in Liverpool, living in Great Crosby and enlisted at Liverpool. His number dates to around the 7th or 8th August 1914 and he presumably died as a result of accident or sickness. I have been unable to find this man on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's roll of honour.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 9 September 2010

204004 Pte Walter Davy, 2/5th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers

Over 1500 British Army officers and men died on this day in 1916. Soldiers Died reports that 204004 Private Walter Davy of the 2/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on this day. Walter was born in Nelson, Lancashire and enlisted there with the East Lancashire Regiment (number 4545). He is buried in Delville Wood Cemetery in Longueval, France.

The fact that Soldiers Died and CWGC give his six digit number (which wasn't introduced until some months after Walter had been killed) suggests that he was originally posted missing, his body presumably recovered and buried some time afterwards.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 8 September 2010

2472 Pte John Holden, 1/10th Bn, Manchester Regt

2472 Private John Holden of the 1/10th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, died of wounds at sea; wounds sustained during the Gallipoli campaign. He was one of nearly a thousand men to enlist in the 10th Manchesters in September 1914 and he enlisted at Oldham, Lancashire. He arrived overseas on the 16th August 1915.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 7 September 2010

28954 Pte Caleb March, 2/8th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt

28954 Private Caleb March of the 2/8th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 7th September 1917. He had previously served with the Worcestershire regiment (number 31102). Caleb was born in Evesham, was living in Bengeworth and enlisted at Pershore (all Worcestershire locations).

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records his name as Caleb Valentine (Tony) March and notes that he was 18 years old, the son of Allen and A X March, of 303 Bridge Street, Evesham. He is buried in Oxford Road Cemetery in Ypres.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 6 September 2010

10203 Pte Albert V Flockton, 1st Bn, Coldstream Gds

10203 Private Albert Victor Flockton of the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, was killed in action on the 6th September 1914. He was born in Stratford-upon-Avon and enlisted at Coventry in June or July 1913. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was 20 years old, the son of Joseph William and Emma Flockton of 137 Little Heath Road, Foleshill, Coventry. He is listed on a special memorial in Montreuil-aux-Lions British Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 5 September 2010

Lt Guy C O Oldfield, Queen's


Lieutenant Guy Christopher Otley Oldfield of the Queen's(Royal West Surrey Regiment) died on the 5th September 1914. At the time of his death he was attached to the 4th Battalion, King's African Rifles. He was 25 years old, the son of colonel C G Oldfield. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Nairobi British & Indian Memorial in Kenya.

The biography above is taken from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Officers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

13463 Gdmn Percy Unsworth Battle, 2nd Bn, Grenadier Guards

13463 Guardsman Percy Unsworth Battle of the 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards, was killed in action on the 4th September 1914. He was born in Wickham Market, Suffolk, and enlisted at Colchester in November 1907. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the husband of R E Battle of 36 Weald Road, Brentwood.

The 1911 census records that Percy, by then on the Army Reserve, was working as a twenty-one year old police constable at Brentwood police station. When war was declared however, he was called up when war was declared, arriving in France on the 13th August. He is buried in the Guards Grave, Villers Cotteret Forest, France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 3 September 2010

Maj Bertram C Parr, Ox and Bucks

Major Bertram Chambre Parr of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, died on the 3rd September 1918. At the time of his death he was attached to the 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. He is buried in Vaulx Hill Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Officers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

67611 Gnr Charles A Gidney, RHA

67611 Gunner Charles Alfred Gidney of L Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, died of wounds on the 2nd September 1914. He was 20 years old and he is buried in Baron Cemetery in France.

Charles Gidney's medal index card notes that he arrived in France on the 15th August 1914 and that his father applied for his son's 1914 Star in November 1918. The address was The White House, Marsham, Norwich. There is an additional note that his British War Medal was "returned found" on the 21st August 1975.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 1 September 2010

12785 Rfm Samuel W Powley, 8th Bn, KRRC

12785 Rifleman Samuel William Powley of the 8th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, died of wounds on the 1st September 1916. He was born and lived in Sevenoaks in Kent, and he enlisted at Tonbridge. At the time of his death he was 19 years old, the son of Mrs S A Powley of 21 Bushes Road, St John's Hill, Sevenoaks. He is buried in Heilly Station Cemetery at Mericourt L'Abbe.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Naval & Military Press