Wednesday, 30 June 2010

The day Sussex died


3oth June 1916. The Boar's Head, Richebourg.

SD/1637 Charlie Hodges, back row, far left, was killed in action on this day whilst serving with the 12th (Service) Battalion (2nd South Down), Royal Sussex Regiment. The photo dates from happier times and shows the Newick School cricket team in 1909. You can read more about this on my Chailey 1914-1918 blog.

Charles Hodges was born in Newick, Sussex and joined the 2nd South Down Battalion at Lewes in November 1914. At the time of his death he was 20 years old. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of the late G Hodges.

Charles has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial. He was one of over 1100 casualties sustained by the Sussex Regiment's South Down battalions that morning. You can read more about their attack on the Boar's Head on my Chailey website.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 29 June 2010

46209 Pte James Mitton, 13th Bn, York & Lancs

I was a day ahead of myself yesterday, consequently here's what I should have written:

46209 Private James Mitton of the 13th Battalion, York & Lancaster Regiment, was killed in action on the 28th June 1918. He was born in Burnley and had formerly served with the West Yorkshire Regiment (number 41906).

James was 20 years old when he died. He was the son of Mr M Mitton of 2 Rectory Road, Burnley and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 28 June 2010

SD/1051 Pte Herbert H Hobbs, 11th Bn, Royal Sussex Regiment

SD/1051 Private Herbert Henry Hobbs of the 11th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, was killed in action on the 29th June 1916; one day before the South Down battalions would suffer catastrophic casualties in a diversionary attack on the Boar's Head. Herbert was 21 years old, the son of Mrs Mary Ann Hobbs of 83 Bexhill Road, West St. Leonards, Hastings. He is buried in St Vaast Post Military Cemetery at Richebourg L'Avoue in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 27 June 2010

19935 Benjamin H Blackmur, Norfolk Regiment

19935 Pte Benjamin Hubert Blackmur of the 1st Battalion, Norfolk Regiment, died of wounds in England on the 27th June 1918. He is buried in Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 26 June 2010

3049 Pte George Oag, 5th Bn, Seaforth Highlanders

3049 Private George Oag of the 5th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, died of wounds on the 26th June 1915. His number indicates that he joined the battalion around the 15th August 1914. George was born in Thurso and enlisted there as well. He almost certainly joined E Company which was the Thurso Company of the 5th Seaforths.

George's medal card indicates that he arrived overseas on the 1st May 1915. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records that he was the son of Mr and Mrs Andrew Oag of 6, Duke Street, Thurso, Caithness. He is buried in Longuenesse (St Omer) Souvenir Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 25 June 2010

166381 Gnr Richard Peet, RGA

166381 Gunner Richard Peet of 208 Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, died of wounds on the 25th June 1917. He is buried in Trois Arbres Cemetery in Steenwerck, Belgium.

Richard was a Lancashire man, born in Southport and living in Walton when he enlisted. He joined the RGA at Preston.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 24 June 2010

25736 Pte Donald Lamont, 8th Bn, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

25736 Private Donald Lamont of the 8th Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 24th June 1916. He was born in Paisley, and was living in Paisley but enlisted at Enniskillen in Ireland. Donald was the son of John and Jessie Lamont of Paisley, and the husband of Agnes Colquhoun Lamont of 23 Thread Street, Paisley. He was 32 years old and is buried in the Bois-Carre Military Cemetery in Haisnes.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 23 June 2010

38366 Gnr Sydney W Clifton, RGA

Two days ago, the number of UK service personnel killed as a result of the Afghanistan conflict since 2001 reached 300. On this single day in 1917, the British Army lost 302 officers and men; a pretty average day for life - and death -on the Western Front during the First World War.

38366 Gunner Sydney William Clifton of the Royal Garrison Artillery was killed in action on the 23rd June 1917. He was a regular soldier who was born in Nottingham and enlisted there in December 1912. He arrived overseas with the 115th Heavy Battery, RGA on the 2nd October 1914, and could thus claim to be an Old Contemptible. He was later posted to the 19th Siege Battery and it was whilst serving with this battery that he was killed.

Sydney (spelled "Sidney" on Soldiers Died in The Great War) was 22 years old when he died. He was the Son of William and Matilda Clifton of 161 Colwick Road, Sneinton, Nottingham. He is buried in the Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery, British Extension.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 22 June 2010

Capt Sir John Edward Fowler, 4th Bn, Seaforth Highlanders


Captain Sir John Edward Fowler of the 4th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, was 30 years old when he was killed in action near Richebourg L'Avoue on the 22nd June 1915. His body was repatriated and he was buried with military honours in the Foich burial ground, a private cemetery on the Fowler's Bramore estate near Garve in Scotland. The Commonwealth war Graves Commission notes that Sir John was 31 years old, "3rd Bart. Son of Sir John Arthur Fowler, 2nd Bart. and Lady Fowler, of Inverbroom House, Braemore, Garve. His brother Alan also fell."

Alan Arthur Fowler had been killed in action two months earlier but unlike his brother he has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres.

There is a detailed an interesting thread on the Fowler brothers on the Scottish War Memorials Project forum. Click Here.

The photograph of Sir John's funeral, and the text which follows are taken from the am baile site.

Captain Sir John Fowler Bt, of Braemore, was the son of Sir John Arthur Fowler Bt, and grandson of Sir John Fowler, the 1st Baronet, who was honoured for his work as Engineer in Chief of the Forth Bridge. Captain Sir John Fowler, the 3rd Baronet, joined the Seaforth Highlanders in 1904, and became Adjutant of the 4th (Ross-shire) Territorial Battalion in 1913. He went to France with the 4th Seaforth in 1914...

His mother Lady Fowler kept very full records of her sons and of the 4th (Territorial) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. Her beautiful albums recording the Battalion's service in France are today in the Regimental Museum of The Highlanders at Fort George. Together with Mrs JW Fraser of Leckmelm, she also published in 1921 'Records of the Men of Lochbroom 1914-1918', a book of tributes to all the local men who died in the service of their country in World War I.


Obituaries and portrait photographs of the brothers also appear in the book, Harrow Memorials of the The Great War, Volume II. Sir John's obituary reads:

Elder brother of Captain Alan Fowler, whose record appears on the preceding page, and eldest son of Sir John Arthur Fowler, Bart., of Braemore, Ross-shire, N.B., whom he succeeded as third baronet in 1899, and of Alice Janet Clive, daughter of the late Sir Edward Clive Bayley, K. C.S.I.

Royal Military College, Sandhurst, 1903.

Captain Sir John Fowler joined the 2nd Seaforths in 1904 ; for three years he acted as Assistant Adjutant, and as Officer in charge of the Brigade Machine Guns. He held a Commission in the Royal Company of Archers and acted as Aide-de-Camp to the Lord High Commissioner of the Church of Scotland at Holyrood in 1907 and 1908. At the outbreak of the War he was seconded as Adjutant of the 4th Battalion, the first Highland Territorial Battalion selected for service in France. After two months' training at Bedford they went to the Front in November, 1914, taking part in an engagement at Festubert in the following month, and in the Battles of Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge. Captain Fowler was killed in the trenches on June 22nd, 1915, near Richebourg I'Avoue. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of November, 1915, "for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field." The official expression of " the King's high appreciation of these services" was received by his family on March 28th, 1916.

Brigadier-General Ross, C.B., wrote: "He was one of the very best young Officers I have ever met, and an example to all others. It was mainly due to his wonderful influence that the Battalion did so well."

The Hon. E. O. Campbell, Adjutant of the 2nd Seaforths, wrote: "We shall always miss Jack: one of the best and kindest of men, and always thoroughly beloved by every one in the Regiment."

Lieut.-Colonel Cuthbert, C.M.G., D.S.O., Commanding 4th Seaforths, wrote: "He lived a soldier's life, ever ready to do his duty, and one always knew how well that duty would be done. He gave us all confidence — confidence that otherwise we could never have had. He has died a soldier's death, and we are the poorer by a very gallant gentleman and capable Officer."

Sergeant-Major, later Lieutenant, Glass, wrote: "He was the guide, adviser, and helpmate of every individual in the Battalion, and we miss him terribly. Defeat could not have shaken us more."


At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 21 June 2010

6030 Sgt Harry Budd, RFA

6030 Sergeant Harry Budd of 14th Battery, 4th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died in Mesopotamia on the 21st June 1916. He was born in Petersfield, Hampshire, and enlisted at Winchester. He is bureid in Basra War Cemetery in modern-day Iraq.

Harry Budd's medal index card notes that he died of disease. He had arrived overseas as a corporal on the 14th October 1914, and was promoted to sergeant some time later. He was entitled to the 1914 Star and British War and Victory Medals.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 20 June 2010

Lt Philip G McMaster, 18th Bn, MGC

Lieutenant Philip George McMaster of the 18th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, was killed in action on the 20th June 1918. He was the son of John and Margaret McMaster, of Tullyard House, Lisburn, County Down and had previously served with the Royal Irish Rifles, arriving in France with the regiment on the 22nd July 1916. He later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and is buried in Ribemont Communal Cemetery Extension on the Somme.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 19 June 2010

C/9887 Rfm Ralph S Butt, 20th Bn, KRRC

C/9887 Rifleman Ralph Stanley Butt of the 20th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, was killed in action on the 19th June 1917. He was born in Frome, Somerset and enlisted there in January 1916. He was the son of Mrs Louisa R Butt of 4 Bell Lane, Frome, and was 24 years old when he died. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 18 June 2010

18939 Pte William Rostron, 8th Bn, South Lancs Regt

18939 Private William Rostron of the 8th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment, was one of 441 British Army officers and men to die on the 18th June 1917. He was born in Pendleton, Lancashire and he was still living there when he enlisted at Burnley on the 30th April 1915. He was 25 years old and a glass blower by trade.

William was posted to the 3rd Battalion on the 8th May 1915 but went absent without leave the following month and was declared a deserter on the 7th June. He rejoined the battalion on the 2nd July and six dayts later was awarded 21 days' detention for his transgression.

On the 16th December 1915 he was awarded 10 days' Field Punishment No 2 but was sent overseas to France two days later. Whilst serving with the 8th Battalion he received a gunshot wound to the head on 15th July 1916 and was returned to England aboard the Hospital Ship St George five days later.

He returned to France on the 2nd May 1917 but hadnot been overseas very long before he was fatally wounded. He died at the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station on the 18th June 1917.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 17 June 2010

17227 Gnr Willie Ousey, RFA

17227 Gunner Willie Ousey of B Battery, 169th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on the 17th June 1916. He was 23 years old, the son of Herbert and Eliza Jane Ousey of Heyside, Oldham, and the husband of Martha Ousey of 50 Clyde Street, Watersheddings, Oldham. He is buried in Betrancourt Military Cemetery on the Somme.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 16 June 2010

11945 Pte Edward James Backlog, 1st Bn, Lincs Regt

11945 Private Edward James Backlog of the 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 16th June 1915. He was born in Thetford, Norfiolk and was still living there at the time of his enlistment. He enlisted at Bourne in Lincolnshire in September 1914 and was in France by the 11th November 1914. Such an early arrival overseas suggests that he probably had previous military experience and as he was 37 years old when he died, this would seem to be a distinct possibility. He was perhaps a time-expired regular with the Lincolnshire Regiment, although in the absence of a service record this must remain conjecture for the time being.

Edward was the son of John Edward and Sarah Ann Backlog of 30 Bury Road, Thetford, Norfolk. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission


Tuesday, 15 June 2010

G/7050 Pte Arthur Airth, 4th Bn, Middx Ret

G/7050 Private Arthur Airth of the 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, died in Bailleul, France on the 15th June 1915, probably as a result of sickness. He was born in Hackney, was living at Maida Vale, and enlisted somewhere in London. His number indicates that he enlisted for wartime service only in early January 1915, and his medal index card shows that he arrived overseas in France on the 7th April that year. He is buried in the Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord).

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 14 June 2010

22612 A/Sgt Albert F Ouzman, 7th Bn, Lincs Regt

22612 Acting Sergeant Albert Frederick Ouzman of the 7th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, died of wounds on the 18th June 1918. He was born in Long Eaton, Derbyshire, and enlisted at Spilsby in Lincolnshire. He was 26 years old, the son of George and Eveline Ouzman of Spilsby, and the husband of Laura Ouzman, of The Lilacs, Reynard Street, Spilsby. He is buried in Niederzwehren in Germany. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission writes:

"The cemetery was begun by the Germans in 1915 for the burial of prisoners of war who died at the local camp. During the war almost 3,000 Allied soldiers and civilians, including French, Russian and Commonwealth, were buried there In 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Niederzwehren was one of those chosen and in the following four years, more than 1,500 graves were brought into the cemetery from 190 burial grounds in Baden, Bavaria, Hanover, Hesse and Saxony. There are now 1,796 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the Commonwealth plot at Niederzwehren. This total includes special memorials to 13 casualties buried in other cemeteries in Germany whose graves could not be found."

Albert's service record survives and there is also an entry about him in De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour. It reads:

OUZMAN, ALBERT FREDERICK, Sergt, No 22612, 7th (Service) Battn, The Lincolnshire Regt, s[on] of George Ouzman of Simpson Street, Spilsby, Metal Merchant, by his wife Evalina, dau[ghter] of John and Eliza Wilkins of Wells, co[unty] Somerset; b[orn] Long Eaton, co[unty] Derby, 10 June 1892; educ[ated] Spilsby; was a metal merchant; enlisted 7 April 1916, served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 24 July following, and died at Cassel, Germany, 14 June 1918, from wounds received in action during the 21 March previously, when he was taken prisoner. Buried in the Cassel Camp Cemetery. He m[arried] at East Keal near Spilsby, 21 June 1915, Laura (Reynard Street, Spilsby), dau[ghter] of Joseph (and Sussanah) Meers, and had a dau[ghter], Sybil Winifred May, b[orn] 18 March 1916.

Albert's service record notes that he originally attested on the 17th November 1915, possibly under the Derby Scheme, and was called up on the 9th April 1916. His number is noted as 9/22612 and his home address given as Queen Street, Spilsby. Albert's occupation is recorded as storeman, and the date of his wound given as 24th March 1918.

Albert set sail from Folkestone on the 24th July 1916 and arrived at Boulogne the following day. He proceeded to the 9th Infantry Base Depot at Etaples the same day and was posted to the 8th Battalion of the The Lincolnshire Regiment. On the 16th August he was posted to the 7th Battalion. His service record is a little unclear in places due to water damage but he was first appointed lance-corporal, then promoted to corporal on the 11th May 1917. He was appointed paid lance-sergeant on the 31st August 1917 and appointed paid acting sergeant on the 26th January 1918.

There is a report in Albert's file giving details of his death. He had received a gunshot wound in his back and died of "Suppurative Pleurisy". His date of capture is noted as the 25th March 1918 at Le Transloy and his date of admission at Camp Cassel, Niederzwehren as the 30th April that year. His relatives were notified of his death on the 15th June 1918. His parents' names and address, and his wife's name and address are all recorded.

In March 1919, the Pensions' Office wrote to Laura Ouzman advising her that she had been awarded a weekly pension of 22 shillings and eleven pence for herself and her daughter

On 14th September 1922, three days after receiving Albert's British War and Victory medals, Laura Ouzman wrote to the Officer in Charge of Records at Lichfield asking if her late husband's memorial scroll could also be sent to her. There is no recorded reply.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363, De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 13 June 2010

200560 Pte Frank W Earley, 1/4th Bn Royal Berks Regt

200560 Private Frank Washbourne Earley, 1/4th Bn Royal Berkshire Regiment, died in Italy on the 13th June 1918. He is buried in the Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension which is situated in the Italian Province of Vicenza.

Frank Earley joined the Royal Berks Regiment in late August or early September 1914. His original number was 2670, and he arrived overseas in France on the 30th March 1915. His service record does not survive but he almost certainly died as a result of sickness or disease.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 12 June 2010

62276 Bdr Robert Patchett, RGA

62276 Bombardier Robert Patchett of the 2nd Siege Battarey, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in action on the 12th June 1917. He was the the son of William and Harriett Patchett, of Leicester; husband of Ann Lucy Clarice Patchett, of 68 Ivanhoe Street, Leicester. He is buried in Henin Communal Cemetery Extension in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 11 June 2010

4958 Pte Joseph Nissen, 4th Bn, London Regt

4958 Private Joseph Nissen of the 4th (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers) The London Regiment, died in England on the 11th June 1916. He was born in Stepney, was living at Stratford and enlisted at Shaftesbury Street, north London. His number dates to June 1915.

Joseph's real name was Nissenblatt and he was Jewish by faith. He proceeded overseas with the 4th Londons in October 1915, landing in France on the 27th of that month. His service papers no longer survive and so it's an assumption that he was returned to England as a result of sickness or wounds. He almost certainly died as a result of sickness.

Joseph was entitled to the 1914-15 Star and the British war and Victory medals. His sister was recorded as the recipient of these and her details, as recorded on the 13th October 1920, were Mrs Rachel Kutchinsky, 161 Vicarage Lane, Stratford, E15. Her brother is buried in the Plashet Jewish Cemetery in East Ham.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 10 June 2010

47712 Pte Harold B Perris, 26th Bn, Royal Fusiliers

47712 Private Harold Barton Perris of the 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, died of wounds on the 10th June 1917. He was born in Manchester and enlisted there. Soldiers Died in The Great War notes that he was formerly 5122 Royal Fusiliers. His medal index card records that number as Spts/5122 which in turn indicates a joining sate of late 1915 or early 1916.

Harold Perris was 33 years old when he died. He was the son of George Henry and Annie Perris, of Manchester, and he is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Belgium.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 9 June 2010

10910 Pte William Harry Baggaley, 2nd Bn, Welsh Regt

10910 Private William Harry Baggaley of the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, was killed in action on the 9th June 1915. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of Mrs Sarah Jane Baggaley of 27 Windmill Street, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent. He was 25 years old at the time of his death and had been a regular soldier with the Welsh Regiment since early February 1913.

William was an early arrival in France, disembarking there on the 22nd August 1914. His medal index card notes that he was regarded as dead on the 9th June 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial in France. Soldiers Died in The Great War records his name as BAGGELEY.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 8 June 2010

200881 Sgt Henry Himsworth, 1/4th Bn, York & Lancs Regt

200881 Sergeant Henry Himsworth of C Compnay, the 1/4th Battalion, York & Lancaster Regiment, died as a result of a gunshot wound to the pelvis on the 8th June 1919. He was 30 years old, the only son of Mr John Wilfred Himsworth of 99 Bradley Street, Crookes.

The 1901 census shows Henry as a 12 year old boy living at 99 Bradley Street with his parents (both aged 39) and three sisters. His father's trade is recorded as "razor grinder" whilst his older sister Lucy - 16 years old in 1901 - was working as in a silver warehouse.

Henry's service record survives in the WO 363 series at the National Archives, and the following information is taken from this. He volunteered with the 4th York and Lancs on the 8th November 1914 and was given the service number 2726. His home address was the one mentioned above.

Henry was posted to the 2/4th Battalion on 13th April 1915 and then back to the 1/4th on the 27th June. He was appointed acting corporal on the 13th June 1917 and acting paid lance-sergeant on the 10th October 1917. He was promoted to acting paid sergeant nine days later, and then to full sergeant in December 1917. By now, his old Territorial Force number would have been replaced with 200881.

Two days after he had been posted back to the 1/4th Battalion, Henry had sailed for France, arriving there on the 29th June 1915. There is no indication on his service record that he returned to England at any point, but a gunshot wound to his thigh is noted.

Henry was captured on the 13th October 1918 and later repatriated to London in January 1919. From the 10th to the 18th January he was in King George Hospital, London and was then transferred immediately to Wharncliffe War Hospital in Sheffield. At the time of his transfer there was "practically no movement in [his] knee or hip." An operation was found necessary in May 1919 and it appears that septicaemia soon followed. He died as a result of what must have been a long and painful wound, and septicaemia. The time of death was recorded as quarter past nine in the morning and his parents were at his bedside when he died. Medical records in his file give his age as 28 and his religion as Wesleyan. He is buried in Sheffield (Crookes) Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, 1901 census, BMD registers, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 7 June 2010

B/23255 Pte Richard C Corti, 26th Bn, Royal Fusiliers

Nearly two and a half thousand men died on the 7th June 1917. B/23255 Private Richard Clarence Corti of the 26th (Bankers') Battalion, Royal Fusiliers was killed in action on this day. He was born in Plaistow, was living in Manor Park and enlisted at East Ham.

Richard may have initially enlisted in the 32nd (Service) Battalion which was a local East Ham battalion formed on the 18th October 1915. His number appears to date to early 1916.

Richard was the son of David William and Evelyn Alice Corti of Manor Park, Essex and was 21 years old when he died. He is commemorated on a special memorial in Voormezeele Enclosure Number 3 in Belgium, and may be one of five casualties whose remains could not be found when graves in Pheasant Wood Cemetery were re-located to Voormezeele.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, 1901 census, BMD registers)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 6 June 2010

130598 Pte Robert Vyell, MGC

130598 Private Robert Vyell of the 50th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps (formerly 654303 East Surrey Regiment), was killed in action on the 6th June 1918. Robert was a Londoner; a young soldier born in Hackney in late 1898 or early 1899 who enlisted (or was conscripted) at Tottenham. He appears on the 1901 census as a two year-old living at 22 Middleton Road, Hackney with his sisters Catherine G Vyell (aged eight) and Liliam M Vyell (aged three months). His parents are recorded as Annie G[race] Vyell (nee Brady, aged 30) and Robert Vyell, a 32 year-old Tottenham-born plasterer. Annie Vyell was born at Clerkenwell and all the children in Hackney.


Robert Vyell has no known grave and is one of nearly 4000 men commemorated on the Soissons Memorial in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, 1901 census, BMD registers)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission


Friday, 4 June 2010

22/1191 Sgt John Dugdale MM, 22nd Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers

22/1191 Sergeant John Dugdale MM of the 22nd Battalion (Tyneside Scottish) Northumberland Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 5th June 1916. He was born in Southwick, County Durham and enlisted at Sunderland between November 1914 and January 1915. There is a note on his medal index card that his widow, who had re-married, applied for a gratuity and a Distinguished Conduct Medal. Her name and address are given as Mrs M Richardson, 58 5th Street, Horden, County Durham.

John Dugdale has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

I will be travelling on the 5th June and am therefore posting this one day ahead of John Dugdale's death anniversary.

1739 Gnr William A Lewry, RGA

1712 Gunner William Albert Lewry of 74th Company Royal Garrison Artillery, died in India on the 4th June 1918. He was born in Wakefield, Sussex and was living at North Road, Brighton when he enlisted in London.

William's medal index card indicates entitlement to the British War and Victory medals, which in turn indciates that he did not travel overseas until 1st Janaury 1916 at the earliest. His army number does not belong to a Territorial outfit and seems to low for a New Army enlistment. It's possible that the number belongs to the Special Reserve series and was issued in September 1914. In the absence of a service record, however, this must remain conjecture.

William was buried in the Agra Cantonment Cemetery and is commemorated on the Madras 1914-1918 War Memorial in Chennai.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 2 June 2010

S/27052 Rfm George W H Lovelock, 11th Bn, Rifle Brigade


Nearly seven months after the Armistice had been declared, S/27052 Rifleman George Wilfred Hatton Lovelock of the 11th Battalion, Rifle Brigade, died of wounds in England.

George Lovelock was born in West Ham and was living at 160 Crownfield Road, Leyton when he enlisted. He was conscripted into the army on the 8th July 1916 and originally given the number S/24145. He was 33 years old and working as a carman.

Shortly after joining the Rifle Brigade he was transferred to the 112th Training Reserve Battalion (1st September 1916) and given a new number. The following month, on the 28th October 1916 - he was transferred back to the Rifle Brigade and given another number S/27052.

George was a married man and had two daughters at the time of his enlistment. A third daughter would be born on the 30th September 1916. He embarked at Southampton as an 11th Battalion man on the 2nd November 1916 and arrived at Havre the following day. He was immediately posted to the 8th Battalion, Rifle Brigade and subsequently attached (from 5th April 1917) to 176 Company, Royal Engineers. He was posted back to the 11th Battalion on the 14th September 1917.

George's service record indicates that he received a gunshot wound to his lower jaw on the 25th March 1918 and that he was taken Prisoner of War. His fate was obviously unknown at the time because his service record states "killed in action between 20th March 1918 and 1st April 1918". This was subsequently scored through, a subsequent note recording, "P of War, Limburg".

He died at 9.45am on the 2nd June 1919 at The Queen's Hospital in Sidcup Kent as a result of his facial wound and pneumonia. The hospital was "developed as the First World War's major centre for facial and plastic surgery, largely through the efforts of Harold Gillies. Opened in 1917, the hospital and its associated convalescent hospitals provided over 1,000 beds, and between 1917 and 1921 admitted in excess of 5,000 servicemen." [Wikipedia].

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records that George was 36 years old when he died and that he was the "son of George and Esther Lovelock of Stratford, and the husband of Emma Elizabeth Lovelock of 160 Crownfield Road, Leyton, London." He is buried in Chislehurst Cemetery in Kent.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission


Photo of unknown patient and medical team at Queen's Hospital, courtesy of the Gillies Archive.



7606 Cpl Hugh McGuckian, 2nd Bn, Royal Scots


7606 Corporal Hugh McGuckian of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots, was killed in action on the 2nd June 1915. He was a career soldier, born in Wolsingham, County Durham, who had originally attested at Newcastle-upon-Tyne on the 17th June 1901, and joined at Glencorse the following day. His terms of enlistment were three years with the colours and nine on the reserve. At the time of his enlistment he was 18 years and four months old and working as a miner. He was five feet, four inches tall with a fair complexion, brown eyes and brown hair. He had a scar on the middle of his back, and tattoo marks on his left forearm.

Hugh McGuckian served in South Africa in 1902 and later in India. His surviving service record is quite extensive and I attach one page of it, above.

Hugh's stations look like this:

Home: 17th June 1901 to 16th July 1902
South Africa: 17th July 1902 to 13th March 1903
Home: 14th March 1903 to 19th September 1904
India: 20th September 1904 to 8th March 1909
Home: 9th March 1909 to 9th August 1914
BEF France: 10th August 1914 to 2nd June 1915.

At the time of his death, Hugh was a married man with three children, two from his marriage to Mabel Lavinia Chalmers Sloggie (married 23rd August 1912) and one, a daughter - Mary, born in 1910 - from a former marriage. His two boys, James and Harry, would have been one year old and two months old when he died.

Hugh McGuckian has no known grave and is one of over 54,000 men commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was 33 years old, the son of Hugh McGuckian of Dunston-on-Tyne, and the late Mary McGuckian, and the husband of Mabel L C McGuckian of 3 Brandfield Street, Edinburgh.

Hugh McGuckian's name does not appear on the Wolsingham memorial in County Durham, presumably because he had moved out of the area some time before his death.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The image reproduced on this page is Crown Copyright.

Tuesday, 1 June 2010

22114 Pte George Slattery, 10th Bn, Cheshire Regt

22114 Pte George Slattery of the 10th Battalion, The Cheshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 1st June 1916. He is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery at Mont St Eloi.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Naval & Military Press