Monday, 31 May 2010

2184 Pte Irving Frank Noakes, 1/7th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers

2184 Private Irving Frank Noakes of the 1/7th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, died of wounds at Gallipoli on the 31st May 1917. He was born in Bridgenorth, Shropshire, and enlisted at Salford, probably on the 6th or 7th of August 1914. His medal card records his name as Frank Noakes and indicates that he arrived in the Balkans on the 5th May 1915. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records him as Irving Noakes and gives the additional information that he was the son of John and Eliza Noakes of Burwarton, Salop. He is buried in the Lancashire Landing Cemetery in Turkey.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 30 May 2010

Lt Frank Lipp, 2nd Bn, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

Lieutenant Frank Lipp of the 2nd Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), died of wounds on the 30th May 1916. At the time of his death he was attached to the 8th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Frank was 24 years old at the time of his death. He was the son of James and Eliza Mary Lipp of La Perouse, Fochabers, Morayshire. He died at the station hospital in Karachi and was buried in the Karachi Cemetery (now Pakistan but at that time, part of India). He is commemorated on the Delhi Memorial (India Gate).

Frank's medal index card indicates that he first arrived overseas at Gallipoli on the 23rd October 1915. At that stage he was a second lieutenant. He later transferred to the RWF. The address given on his MIC is "J Lipp Esq, Hadlow House, Fochabers, Scotland." Today, Hadlow House at 22 The Square, Fochabers, is an antiques' shop.

Frank's brother, Vernon Robertson Lipp, also died during the First World War. He was a second lieutenant serving with the 5th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, but attached to the 12th Battalion. He was 26 years old when he was killed in action on the 17th June 1916. He is buried in Berks Cemetery Extension in Belgium. Vernon's medal index card gives his wife's address at Lorne Grove, Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottingham. She was Elsie C Thompson and the couple's marriage was registered at Lincoln in the June quarter of 1916. Thus Elsie was a wife and a widow within the space of three months.

Frank and Vernon Lipp both appear on the 1901 Scotland census as visitors - along with many others - at the Invercauld Arms in Glenmuick, Aberdeenshire. The boys' ages are noted as nine and eleven respectively. Together in 1901, fate would see them die within three weeks of each other in the service of their King and Country, fifteen years later.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 29 May 2010

218529 Bdr William Moffat, RFA

Six hundred and forty-five British Army officers and men died on this single day, 29th May, in 1918. 218529 Bombardier William Moffat of A Battery, 150th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died of wounds on this day. He had previously enlisted for war-time service with the Gordon Highlanders, his number - S/9991 - indicating that he must have joined the Gordons in early May 1915. The Royal Artillery number dates to post February 1917.

Bombardier Moffat is one of 585 men buried in Vignacourt British Cemetery, France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 28 May 2010

Lt Erle Britt Trotter, 3rd Bn, Royal West Kent Regt

Even after the First World war ended, men who had served during the war were still dying in uniform, or dying of their wounds. Lieutenant Erle Britt Trotter of the 3rd Battalion,Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), died on the 28th May 1919.

Erle's medal index card shows that he first served with the 1st Home Counties Field Ambulance. His number indicates that he joined at the end of November or the beginning of December 1912. He arrived in France on the 17th December 1914 as a sergeant and with the number 2100. When the Territorial Force was re-numbered in 1917 he was given a new number: 493093.

Erle was awarded the Distinguished Conducted Medal whilst serving as sergeant with the RAMC and this was gazetted on the 26th January 1917. His citation reads:

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed great courage and determination when in charge of a number of stretcher bearer squads. On several occasions he personally attended the wounded under very heavy fire."

Sergeant Trotter was commissioned in the Royal West Kent Regiment on the 24th November 1917 and would win the Military Cross whilst serving with the regiment; a brave man who died at home in Gillingham (cause of death unknown) in 1919. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records that he was 26 years old and also held the "Medaille Militaire (France). [He was the] son of Alice Harris (formerly Trotter) and the late William Richard Trotter of 225 Canterbury Street, Gillingham."

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
London Gazette

Thursday, 27 May 2010

17015 Pte Harold E Probert, 16th Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regt

17015 Private Harold Edwin Probert of the 16th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 27th May 1917. He was 30 years old, the son of William and Eliza Probert of 44, Broughton Road, Handsworth, Birmingham.

Harold's number dates to the 2nd or 3rd March 1916. He was almost certainly a Derby Scheme volunteer who had originally attested in December 1915 and been called up in March. His number does not belong to the series that was initially begun for the 16th Battalion (3rd Birmingham Pals) and if his service record is anything like those of some of the other men who joined up at the same time, he could have found himself overseas as early as the 13th June 1916. Harold's service record does not survive and so it is difficult to be precise about his exact movements. He is buried in Roclincourt Valley Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 26 May 2010

2990 L/Cpl Willard A Uglow, 23rd Bn, London Regt

2990 Lance-Corporal William Alec Uglow of the 23rd (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment, was killed in action on the 26th May 1915. William was living at Woodford and enlisted at Clapham Junction on the 16th September 1916. He was 23 years and eight months old, five feet, nine inches tall and with good vision and good physical development. His name was at first recorded as William and it is by this name that he is recorded on Soldiers Died in The Great War.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that Willard was the "only son of William James and Hettie Uglow of 2 Nelson Road, Wanstead, Essex. A linguist (Arabic, French, Spanish, Italian, German). Metallurgical Chemist in Duisberg, Germany."

Willard, who initially signed up for home service only, was embodied with the 2/23rd Battalion on the 16th September 1914. On 17th February 1915 he took the Imperial Service obligation and ten days later he was posted to the 1/23rd Battalion. He sailed for France on the 14th March 1915 and was appointed unpaid lance-corporal on the 18th May. Eight days later he was posted "missing" and later "presumed killed in action".

Willard was one of 203 23rd London men to died on this day. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 25 May 2010

396749 Pte Abel Parfitt, Labour Corps

396749 Private Abel Parfitt of the 49th Company, The Labour Corps, was killed in action on the 25th May 1918. He died when a shell exploded in the village where he happened to be, causing heavy casualties. Ironically, he had not been feeling well that day, had reported sick and, along with a party of other men, was on his way to see the doctor when the shell dropped.

Abel Parfitt had previously served with the 3rd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers (number 61539). According to Soldiers Died in The Great War he was born in Abram, Lincolnshire, was living at Woodlesford, Leeds, and enlisted at Leeds.

Abel was 37 years old, the son of Abel and Elizabeth Parfitt, and the husband of Nan Parfitt of 3 Springside, Todmorden, Lancashire. The Commonwealth war Graves Commission records that he was born at Wigan. He is buried in Querrieu British Cemetery in France.

Abel's partial service record survives at the National Archives in London. He attested on the 15th February 1916 but it wasn't until the 27th April 1917 that he was called up. He gave his address at attestation as 4 Back Eshald Place, Woodlesford although he appears to have moved subsequently as a second address - 13 Victoria Street, Featherstone - has been over-written. He was aged 33 years and 10 months at attestation, a coal miner by trade. He was posted to the 3rd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

Hannah Jane Shaw is recorded as Abel's next of kin, her relationship to him noted as "paramour". There is a marriage date noted however- 22nd February 1908 - although their two children are recorded as William Henry Shaw (born 5th May 1909) and John Shaw (born 5th April 1911). Both children were born at Ashton-under-Line.

A note by Hannah Shaw to CSM Dakin of the 49th Company, written after Abel Parfitt was killed, reads, "Please note that the c/o has addressed me as Mrs Parfitt, as I was known to everyone as the wife of Pte A Parfitt..."

Having arrived in France with the RWF on the 9th August 1917, Abel was transferred to the 35th Company Labour Corps (15th October 1917) and later, still in France, posted to the 49th Company. By this stage he had already been hospitalised in France (in January 1918) with PUO: Pyrexia of Unknown Origin, the medical term generally used to describe trench fever.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 24 May 2010

40457 Pte Henry G Wond, 10th Bn, RDF

40457 Private Henry George Wond of the 10th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 24th May 1917. He had previously served with the King's Liverpool Regiment and had the number 11083.

Henry was born in Bermondsey, was living in Falkirk and enlisted at Warley in Essex. His service record does not survive but it is clear from his medal index card that he arrived overseas with the King's on or after the 1st January 1916. There are a couple of possibilities for his joining date. 11083 would have been issued to a regular soldier in the King's in early 1911 or to a Special Reservist (3rd Battalion) in August 1914. There was a 4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion but I have no evidence to suggest that the original numbering in this battalion reached as high as 11083. If it did, it was certainly post August 1914.

My data for the DLI is a little thin but it would appear that the transfer took place post August 1916.

Henry has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.


At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 23 May 2010

1656 Sgt George Dullam Blackman, 21st London Regt


1656 Sergeant George Dullam Blackman of the 21st (County of London) Battalion (1st Surrey Rifles), The London Regiment, was killed in action on the 23rd May 1916. George was born in Beverley, Yorkshire, was living in Wallington and enlisted at Camberwell on the 4th August 1914. He was a time-expired volunteer with the 1st Surrey Rifles and was aged 31 years and one month. His surviving attestation paper (one page, above) in the WO 363 series at the National Archives notes that he was married and working as a clerk at the London Stock Exchange.

George arrived in France as a corporal on the 16th March 1915 and - unless he returned to England at any point before his death the following year - must have been promoted to sergeant whilst he was overseas.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that George was 32 when he died and that he was the husband of Beatrice Maud Blackman of 43 Courtfield Gardens, South Kensington, London. He had married Maud (nee Beckett) in the Wandsworth district of London in late 1909 or early 1910 and although I haven't found documentary evidence that the couple had children during their short marriage, it would seem likely that they did.

George Blackman has no known grave and is commemorated on bay 10 of the Arras Memorial in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 22 May 2010

1759 Spr Charles Knapper, RE

1759 Sapper Charles Knapper of the 1/2nd North Midland Field Company, Royal Engineers, was killed in action on the 22nd May 1915. He was living in Stoke-on-Trent and enlisted at Smethwick, Staffordshire. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission incorrectly records his initial as E rather than C. He is buried in Packhorse Shrine Farm Cemetery in Belgium.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 21 May 2010

240068 Cpl Walter Bulloch, 5/6th Cameronians

240068 Corporal Walter Bulloch of the 5/6th Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), was killed in action on the 21st May 1917. He was one of 440 British Army officers and men to die on this date.

Walter was born in Dalziell, Lanarkshire and enlisted at Motherwell. His medal index card indicates that he was serving with the 6th Battalion, Scottish Rifles, and that his original number was 1328. This in turn dates his enlistment to around February 9th 1911, give or take a day or so. He arrived in France - as a lance-corporal - on the 20th March 1915 and had therefore been on active service for over two years at the time of his death.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that Walter was 24 years old, the son of William and Catherine Bulloch of 42 Quarry Street, Knowetop, Motherwell, Lanarkshire. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. The 5/6th Battalion was created in May 1916 when the 1/5th and the 1/6th Battalions merged.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 20 May 2010

9010 Rfm James Dolan, 2nd Bn, Royal Irish Rifles

9010 Rifleman James Dolan of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 20th May 1916. He was born in Shankhill, County Antrim, and enlisted in Belfast.

James arrived overseas on the 14th October 1914 and it seems likely therefore, that he was a regular soldier, his number dating to April or May 1908. He could also, conceivably, have been a Special Reservist with the 3rd Battalion - the number dating to August 1914.

James Dolan is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery at Mont St Eloi, France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 19 May 2010

Lt Col Edmund Furse, RFA

Lieutenant Colonel Edmund William Furse of 88th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died on the 19th May 1918. He was a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour, the eldest son of Edmund Furse of Alphington, Frimley, and the husband of Jessie C Furse of 21, Halsey Street, Chelsea, London. He was 41 years old when he died and is buried in Dormans French National Cemetery.

Edmund Furse had arrived in France with the Royal Artillery on the 20th August 1914. He was an army major at that stage and would later become captain and then temporary (according to his medal index card) lieutenant colonel. He was attached to the Royal Flying Corps at the time of his death and his connections with the RFC certainly date back to 1914. His MIC notes that from 18th November 1914 he was to be "GSO 3rd Grade, Royal Flying Corps Headquarters" and in October 1915 he was elected as a member of The Royal Aero Club of the United Kingdom. An earlier edition of the Royal Aero Club's magazine had noted (on 17th September 1915) that Major Furse had obtained his aviator's certificate (number 1706) in a Maurice Farman Biplane at the British Flying School at Le Crotoy, France on the 8th September that year.

Lieutenant Colonel Furse's Legion d'Honneur was gazetted in the Supplement to the Edinburgh Gazette dated 3rd May 1917. At that stage, his rank was major in the Royal Artillery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Flight Global Archive

Tuesday, 18 May 2010

8643 L/Cpl James McFarland, 1st Bn, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

583 British Army officers and men died on this single day in 1915. 8643 Lance-Corporal James McFarland of the 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was killed in action at Gallipoli on the 18th May 1915. He was born in Cappagh, County Tyrone, and enlisted at Omagh.

James probably enlisted about September 1914 and his medal index card indicates that he arrived in the Balkans on the 17th March 1915. He is buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery in Turkey.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 17 May 2010

2nd Lt John Lauderdale Stewart-Richardson, 2nd Bn, Coldstream Gds

Second Lieutenant John Lauderdale Stewart-Richardson of the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards, died on the 17th May 1916. He is buried in the Potijze Burial Ground Cemetery at Ypres.

The Peerage website states:

"Lieutenant John Lauderdale Stewart-Richardson was born on 18 January 1878.1 He was the son of Sir James Thomas Stewart-Richardson of Pitfour, 14th Bt. and Harriett Georgina Alice Cochrane. He married Nora Joyce Rigby daughter of William Rigby on 6 May 1916. He died on 17 May 1916 at age 38, killed in action."

The Peerage states that he gained the rank of Lieutenant, although both Soldiers Died in The Great War and The Commonwealth War Graves Commission give his rank as Second Lieutenant.

The Cambridge Museum in New Zealand gives additional information:

"Sergeant 11/360 John Lauderdale Stewart Richardson Son of Sir James and Lady Harriet Stewart Richardson. Born 18 January 1879. Commission Agent. Enlisted 15 August 1914. Wellington Infantry. Killed in Action 17 May 1916." There is also a photo of a very young-looking J L Stewart-Richardson, and a photo of his headstone which is clearly Coldstream Guards, although the Cambridge Museum makes no mention of this.

The London Gazette notes that John Stewart-Richardson was commissioned as a second lieutenant (on probation) on the 6th November 1915 and his service record, which survives at the National Archives, would of course give the full picture.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The Peerage
The London Gazette
The Cambridge Museum

Sunday, 16 May 2010

300913 Cpl Archibald Morrison, 1/8th Bn, A&S Highlanders

300913 Corporal Archibald Morrison of the 1/8th Battalion, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, was killed in action on the 16th May 1917. He was born in Taynuilt, Argyllshire, and was the son of Mrs Mary Campbell of Pass of Brander, Taynuilt. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

Archibald's age at death is recorded as 18. His number - original number 2768 - dates to January 1915 which means that at best he was 17 when he joined up, or younger still. This may have been discovered by the authorities as he certainly did not proceed overseas until 1916 at the earliest.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 15 May 2010

Lt George Alfred Cosser, 6th Hampshire Regt

Lieutenant George Alfred Cosser of the 6th Hampshire Regiment, died on the 15th May 1916. He was 24 years old, the son of Thomas and the late Mary Jane Cosser of "Portsdown," Northern Parade, Portsmouth, and the husband of Ada Matilda Cosser, of The Meadows, North Hayling, Hampshire. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial in Iraq.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 14 May 2010

36970 L/Cpl Brinley Aubrey, 9th Bn, RWF

36970 Lance-Corporal Brinley Haydn Aubrey of the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, died of wounds on the 14th May 1918. He was born and lived in Briton Ferry, Glamorgan, and he attested at Port Talbot on the 18th November 1915. Brinley's partial service record survives in WO 363 and the following information is taken from this.

When he joined up, Brinley gave his age as 35 years, his address as 89 Neath Road, Briton, and his trade as assistant school teacher. He joined the regiment's 20th Battalion at Port Talbot on the 21st November 1915, and the following April was appointed unpaid lance-corporal. He was promoted to acting corporal on the 27th June 1916.

Ont he 28th August 1916 he reverted to paid lance-corporal and then, three days later,was posted to the 3rd Battalion. On the 29th January 1917 he was appointed acting corporal, and by August that year he had been appointed unpaid lance-sergeant. On 28th January 1918 he sailed for France as part of a draft for the 19th Battalion, and on the 18th March he was posted to the 9th Battalion. It was whilst serving with this battalion that he was mortally wounded. He died at the 83rd General Hospital in Boulogne. He is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 13 May 2010

10061 Cpl William Bolesworth, 1st Bn, Leics Regt

10061 Corporal William Bolesworth of the 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, died of wounds on the 13th May 1915. He was one of 961 British Army officers and men to die on this day. William was born in Hinckley and was living there when he enlisted. He joined the regiment at Leicester.

William's number dates to the 3rd October 1908, a special reservist who later transferred to the regular, 1st Battalion, and retained his special reserve number. His partial service record survives in the WO 363 series at the National Archives and we can see that in October 1908 he was 28 years and four months old, five feet ten inches tall, and working as a hosiery hand.

William was a committed Special Reservist. He underwent a musketry training course for one month in 1909 and was present at the 3rd Battalion's annual training camps every year from 1909 to 1914. The duration of these courses - or William's attendance anyway - varied from two to three weeks and it was whilst he was attending the 1914 course that Britain went to war with Germany. He was mobilised the following day and promoted to corporal on the 8th August. On the 9th November 1914, having transferred to the 1st Battalion, embarked for France.

William was a married man and a father. His wife, Enid, is recorded as his next of kin and a son - Walter George Bolesworth - is also mentioned. William's home address is given as 17 Spring Gardens, Hinckley.

William is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord).

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 12 May 2010

240102 Pte Harry Hall, 5th Bn, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt)

Eight hundred and sixty-five British Army officers and men died on this single day in 1917. Harry Hall was one of the fatalities on the 12th May 1917 and you can read his story on my Army Service Numbers blog, HERE.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 11 May 2010

2322 Rfm Edward Charles Wise, 18th Bn, London Regt

2322 Rifleman Edward Charles Wise of the 18th (County of London) Battalion (London Irish Rifles) The London Regiment, was killed in action on the 11th May 1916. He was living in South Kensington and enlisted at Chelsea in late August or early September 1916.

The Commonwealth war Graves Commission notes that Edward was 21 years old, the son of Mr. F Wise of 50 Ifield Road, Fulham Road,West Brompton, London. He is buried in Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery in Souchez.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 10 May 2010

G/25590 Pte Clarke Owen, 1st Bn, The Queen's

G/25590 Private Clarke Owen of the 1st Battalion, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment), died of wounds on the 10th May 1918. He was born in Runcorn but was living in - and enlisted at - Swansea. He formerly served with the Manchester Regiment - number 55316 - and is buried in Esquelbecq Military Cemetery in France. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was 25 years old, the husband of Rosina Dawes (formerly Owen) of 144 Ladysmith Street, James Bay, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 9 May 2010

21467 L/Cpl John Walley Rangecroft, 1st Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers

21467 Lance-Corporal John Walley Rangecroft of the 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 9th May 1916. He had previously served with the West Yorkshire Regiment - number 10091.

John was born in Hull and probably enlisted there as well. His West Yorkshire Regiment number is a pre-war one and dates to early 1914. 21467 with the Northumberland Fusiliers dates to May 1915, and John's medal index card states that he arrived in France with the Nothumberland Fusiliers on the 13th July 1915.

John Rangecroft is buried in Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery in Belgium.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 8 May 2010

17695 Pte Nathaniel Dedman, 1st Bn, Suffolk Regt

17695 Private Nathaniel Dedman of the 1st Battalion, Suffolk Regiment, was killed in action on the 8th May 1915. He was 35 years old, the husband of Gertrude Dedman of 20 Mount Street, Ryde, Isle of Wight.

Nathaniel's number indicates that he joined up in January 1915 and his medal index card states that he arrived overseas on the 23rd February 1915. It's possible that he had previous military service although this is just conjecture based on the rapidity with which he was sent overseas. His medal card also states that he was died "on or since" 8th May 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 7 May 2010

14006 Pte Cecil Rose, 8th Bn, Suffolk Regt

14006 Private Cecil Rose of the 8th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment, was killed in action on the 7th May 1917, one of over five hundred British Army officers and men to die on this day. He was born in Drinkstone, Suffolk, and enlisted at Drinkstone. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 6 May 2010

9827 Pte William Critchley, 11th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers

9827 Private William Critchley of the 11th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 6th May 1916. He was born in St Helens and enlisted at Warrington in November 1914. He was the son of James and Mary Ellen Critchley of St. Helens, and he is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery in St Eloi.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 5 May 2010

14937 Pte John Nicholas, 7th Bn, Shropshire LI

14937 Pte John Nicholas of the 7th Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry, was killed in action on the 5th May 1917. He was 26 years old, the son of Mrs. Elizabeth Nicholas, of Glanavon, Kilgerran, Pembrokeshire. Soldiers Died in The Great war notes that he was born in, and lived in Kilgerran, Pembrokeshire. He enlisted at Tonypandy.

John Nicholas has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 4 May 2010

3/6979 Cpl Jack Buttle, 1st Bn, Dorsetshire Regt

3/6979 Corporal Jack Buttle of the 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 4th May 1915. He was born in Leyton (now east London, then Essex) and was living there when he enlisted. He joined up at nearby Stratford.

Jack was 18 years and five months old when he enlisted with the 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment on the 23rd October 1913. His attestation papers state that he was working as a casual labourer. He joined the regiment at Dorchester on the 2nd November 1913 and then underwent four months' training which ended on the 27th February 1914.

Jack presumably then returned to Leyton but was mobilized on the 8th August 1914. He was appointed unpaid lance-corporal four days later, and paid corporal exactly on month later. On the 23rd October 1914 he was posted to the 1st Battalion but still retained his 3rd Battalion number. He served overseas in France and Belgium from October 1914 until the time of his death which was due to the effects of poison gas. In his history of the battalion, Major C H Dudley-Ward DSO MC, writes that on the 1st May 1915, the enemy attacked the Dorsetshire positions on Hill 60 with poison gas and that C Company, on the crest of the hill, was particularly affected. Over 200 casualties were recorded. The battalion was relieved the following day and moved back into local reserve at Larch Wood.

Jack's service record notes that he had previously been admitted to the 15th Field Ambulance at Bailleul on the 15th February 1915, suffering from the effects of cold. He rejoined his battalion the same day.

The Commonwealth War Graves records that "John" Buttle was the son of William and Thirza Buttle of 4 Stanley Road, Leyton, London, and that he is buried in Perth Cemetery (China Wall).

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 3 May 2010

22998 Pte George Kingsbury MM, 8th Bn, Border Regiment

22998 Private George Kingsbury MM of the 8th Battalion, Border Regiment, died of wounds on the 3rd May 1918. He was born in Marylebone, London and enlisted in London, originally joining the East Surrey Regiment where his number was 9775.

Papers for George survive in WO 363 at the National Archives, and the following information is taken from these. George joined the East Surrey Regiment on the 9th July 1915. He was, according to his attestation papers, 28 years old and gave his trade as Carman. His address is recorded as 15 Bridfort Street, Marylebone.

George had previously seen six years' service with the East Surrey Militia, later being discharged on the Termination of his Engagement. The date 1905 is written next to this line, which can only mean a joining date as, at 28 when he joined up, he simply would have been too young to have been discharged - after six years - in 1905. However, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, gives George's age at death as 35. If this is his true age, then a 1905 militia discharge date is a possibility.

George had a number of tattoos: a crucifix on his chest and tattoos on both arms.

After his death, a medallion, three rings, a crucifix and bag were returned to George's father in Marylebone.

He is buried in Esquelbecq Military Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 2 May 2010

1123 Spr John Gater, RE

1123 Sapper John Gater, of the 1/2 (North Midland) Field Company, Royal Engineers, died of wounds on the 2nd May 1916. He enlisted at Hanley in Staffordshire and he is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension in France. This from the Commonwealth war Graves Commission:

"Before March, 1916, Aubigny was in the area of the French Tenth Army, and 327 French soldiers were buried in the Extension to the West of what is now Plot IV. From March 1916 to the Armistice, Aubigny was held by Commonwealth troops and burials were made in the Extension until September 1918. The 42nd Casualty Clearing Station buried in it during the whole period, the 30th in 1916 and 1917, the 24th and 1st Canadian in 1917 (during the capture of Vimy Ridge by the Canadian Corps) and the 57th in 1918. The Extension now contains 2,771 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and seven from the Second World War."

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 1 May 2010

G/42676 Pte Edward Clegg, 10th Bn, Queen's

G/42676 Private Edward Clegg of the 10th (Labour) Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment), was killed in action on the 1st May 1917. He had previously served with the Middlesex Regiment, number 78203. He was 41 years old, the husband of Edith Ivy Clegg of 7 Worrall Street, Shawclough, Rochdale. He is buried in Agny Military Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

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