Friday, 30 April 2010

27473 Pte James Lupton, 15th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers

27473 Private James Lupton of the 15th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 30th April 1916. He lost his life on the Somme and has no known grave. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 29 April 2010

38672 Pte Bertie Kemp, 4th Bn, North Staffs Regt

38672 Private Bertie Kemp of the 4th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 29th Aprl 1918. He was 23 years old, the son of William B and Mary Beatrice Kemp of Somersal Hill, Doveridge, Derby. Bertie was living at Rocester, Staffordshire at the time of his enlistment. He enlisted at Uttoxeter.

Bertie Kemp is buried in Bouzincourt Communal Cemetery, one of 33 Commonwealth casualties resting there.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 28 April 2010

23723 Pte William Egan, 2nd Bn, HLI

23723 Private William Egan of the 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, was killed in action on the 28th April 1917. He was born in Dundee and enlisted in the city around August 1915. He is buried in the Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery at Souchez in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 27 April 2010

21162 Pte Joseph Spain, 8th Bn, RDF

21162 Private Joseph Spain of the 8th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 27th April 1916. He was born in Dublin, the son of Joseph and Teresa Spain, of 15 Sullivans Quay, Cork, and enlisted in Dublin at the end of April or early May 1915.

Joseph arrived overseas in France on the 20th December 1915 and was killed near Loos. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 26 April 2010

6519 L/Cpl Joseph Gullen, 1st Bn, KOSB

6519 Lance-Cpl Joseph Gullen of the 1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers, was killed in action on the 26th April 1915. Joseph was 34 years old when he died. He was the husband of Agnes Gordon Gullen of 126, 1st Street East, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Joseph, who had arrived in Egypt as early as the 16th November 1914, is commemorated on a special memorial in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery in Gallipoli, Turkey.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

18/586 Sgt William Horsman, 18th Bn, West Yorks Regt

18/586 Sergeant William Horsman of the 18th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 25th April 1918. William was a Keighley-born man and he enlisted in the town in December 1914.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records William's number incorrectly as 181586 and states that he was serving with the 1/6th Battalion at the time of his death. Soldiers Died in The Great War also confirms the 1/6th (Territorial Force) Battalion. William's medal index card notes that he originally arrived overseas in Egypt on the 22nd December 1915, but he died in Belgium and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. He was 21 years old, the son of Mrs Mary Horsman of 111 Nashville Terrace, Keighley, Yorkshire.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 24 April 2010

Lt Henry Edward Allen, West African Frontier Force

Lt Henry Edward Allen of the Gambia Company, West African Frontier Force, drowned on the 24th April 1917. He was 48 years old, the son of the late William E. and Anne Allen, of Greenford, Middlesex. Henry Allen has no known grave and is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 23 April 2010

306098 Pte Ernest Goodacre, 1/8th Bn, Sherwood Foresters

4,585 British officers and men died on his single day - 23rd April - in 1917. 306098 Private Ernest Goodacre of the 1/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters was one of 70 Notts and Derbyshire men to die on this day. He was killed in action.

Ernest was living in Worksop and he enlisted in Newark. His original number with this Territorial Force battalion was 3507, indicating that he enlisted in the second half of January 1915. He arrived in France on the 28th June 1915.

Ernest was 29 years old when he died. He was the son of Thomas and Clara Goodacre of 2 Duke Place, Worksop, and the husband of Mabel Alice Goodacre of 12 Forrest's Yard, Worksop. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 22 April 2010

S/6259 Pte Frank Stafford, 2nd Bn, Black Watch

S/6259 Private Frank Stafford of the 2nd Battalion, Black Watch, was killed in action on the 22nd April 1916. He was born in Healey, Lancashire, and enlisted at Atherton, originally joining the Gordon Highlanders. Soldiers Died in The Great War gives his Gordons' number as 3094.

S/6259 for the Black Watch dates to late October or early November 1914 which, by a process of elimination, means that Frank must have joined a service battalion of the Gordon Highlanders in September 1914. 3094 for the Gordons' four Territorial Force battalions post-dates early November 1914.

Frank Stafford arrived overseas in France on the 14th July 1915, later sailing for Mesopotamia. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of Joseph Stafford of Nar End Farm, Healey, Rochdale. He is buried in the Amara War Cemetery in Iraq.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 21 April 2010

22508 Pte David McGrory, 2nd Bn, HLI

22508 Pte David McGrory of the 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, was killed in action on the 21st April 1917. At the time of his death he was attached to the 252nd Field Company, Royal Engineers. He is buried in the Achiet-Le-Grand Communal Cemetery.

Soldiers Died and the CWGC both give Private McGrory's name as David. His medal index card however, is in the name of Daniel McGregory and indicates that he arrives overseas on the 23rd November 1915. A second medal index card, held in the name of Daniel McGrory, indicates that he served with the 16th HLI. His number dates to around June 1915.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 20 April 2010

8563 Pte George Haley, 1st Bn, East Surrey Regt

8563 Private George Haley of the 1st Battalion, East Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on the 20th April 1915. He was born in Mile End, east London, and enlisted in London as an eighteen-year-old on the 28th June 1905. He has no known gave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 19 April 2010

25268 Pte Joseph Welbourn, 15th Bn, Cheshire Regt

25268 Private Joseph Welbourn of the 15th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 19th April 1917. He is buried in the Roisel Communal Cemetery in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

6504 Pte William Lyle, 9th Bn, RWF

6504 Private William Lyle of the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 18th April 1918. He was born in Llanwonno, Glamorgan and enlisted at Abercynon.

William was 20 years old when he died. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Bert Lyle of 33 Avondale Street, Ynysboeth, Abercynon, Glamorgan, and the young husband of Alice Eliza Lyle. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial at Zonnebeke.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 18 April 2010

Capt John Joseph Esmonde, RAMC

John Joseph Esmonde, a Territorial Force captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps, died in England on the 17th April 1915. He was the Member of Parliament for North Tipperary and the son of James Esmonde. He died, aged 53, from "pneumonia and heart failure consequent on the strain of overwork" and is buried in his family vault in Terryglass RC Churchyard, co Tipperary. A son, Lieutenant Geoffrey Esmonde, was killed in action in 1916, and a second son - Eugene Esmonde - was awarded a posthumous VC in 1942.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 16 April 2010

G/8807 L/Cpl William Charles Wrack, 8th Bn, RWK

G/8807 Lance-Corporal William Charles Wrack of the 8th Battalion, Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regt, was killed in action on the 16th April 1917. He was born in Peckham, south east London, but was living at Stoke Poges (Buckinghamshire) and enlisted at High Wycombe around July 1915. He hads no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 15 April 2010

S/33032 Rfm John Nullmeyers, 21st Bn, Rifle Brigade

S/33032 Rifleman John Nullmeyers of the 21st Battalion, Rifle Brigade, died on the 15th April 1917 in Salonika. He had previoussly served with the Northamptonshire Regiment (No 13671).

John Nullmeyers was born in Islington, was living in Holloway and enlisted at Hampstead. He is commemorated on the Mikra Memorial in the Mikra British Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 14 April 2010

23730 L/Cpl Herbert Gostelow, 10th Bn. Somerset Light Infantry

23730 Lance-Corporal Herbert Gostelow of the 10th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry died on the 14th April 1916. He was 37 years old. Herbert was born in Odiham, Hampshire, and was living at Camberley, Surrey when he enlisted around late March or early April 1916. He enlisted at Blackwater, Surrey but must have died very shortly afterwards, presumably as a result of sickness or accident.

Herbert Gostelow is buried in Wareham Cemetery in Dorset. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of Joseph George and Maria Gostelow.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 13 April 2010

2755 Pte Edmund Arthur Baker, 1st Bn, Cambs Regt

2755 Private Edmund Arthur Baker of the 1st Battalion, Cambridgeshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 13th April 1915. He was 22 years old, the son of Walter and Martha Baker of Hatley Street, George, Sandy in Bedfordshire. Edmund's number indicates that he joined the Cambridgeshire Regiment in September 1914, and his medal index card states that he arrived overseas in France on the 14th February 1915. No service record appears to survive.

Edmund Baker has no known grave and he is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 12 April 2010

15519 Pte James Gee, 8th Bn King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)

15519 Private James Gee of the 8th Battalion King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment), died of wounds on the 12th April 1916. He was a Manchester-born man who had enlisted in the city in November 1914. He arrived in France on the 27th September 1915 and died in Boulogne. He is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 11 April 2010

39410 Pte Enoch Ditchfield, 5th Bn, DLI

Close to 1800 British Army officers and men died on the 11th April 1918. Soldiers Died in The Great War gives the total casualties as 1,795, and 39410 Pte Enoch Ditchfield was one of those men. He was killed in action whilst serving with the 5th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry.

Enoch was born in Sunderland and attested there in May 1916. He was eighteen years old and working as a men's mercer. Other papers note that he was an apprentice mercer working for H Burns and Sons Ltd. He gave his address as 61 Hylton Road, Sunderland. This was later altered to 70 Eversley Road. At the time of attestation he indicated that his preferred arm of service was the Royal Horse and Field Artillery. However, he was called up in November 1916 and posted to the Durham Light Infantry.

On 15th June 1917, Enoch sailed for France. He was wounded exactly two weeks later on the 29th June by a gunshot wound to his left buttock, and returned to England, spending over three months in Queen Mary's Military Hospital in Whalley, Lancashire. He was discharged, his papers noting that he had a "penetrating wound... with no point of exit" but then re-admitted shortly afterwards when a "large foreign body" (presumably the bullet, or piece of shrapnel) worked its way through into his left thigh. This was removed under local anaesthetic but nevertheless caused Enoch to spent a further two months in hospital at Ripon.

Enoch sailed for France for a second time on the 2nd January 1918. He was posted first to the 19th DLI (3rd January) and then to the 10th DLI (7th January) and then finally to the 5th Battalion on the 3rd February. He spent four days at a Field Ambulance with scabies but rejoined his battalion on the 3rd March. On the 11th April 1918, ninety-two years ago today, Enoch was reported wounded and missing. One year later, his death was officially "presumed" by the War Office to have occurred on or after the 11th April 1918.

Enoch Ditchfield has no known grave and he is commemorated by name on the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 10 April 2010

Nursing Sister Ellen Lucy Foyster, QAIMNS


Nursing Sister Ellen Lucy Foyster of the Special Reserve, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service, was drowned on the 10th April 1917. She was 36 years old, the daughter of Rebecca Foyster of 37 Madeira Avenue, Worthing, Sussex, and the late H A Foyster. She had been on active service since 1915.

This from Wikipedia:

"While returning to pick up wounded at the port of Le Havre, France, HMHS Salta struck a mine at 11:43, one mile north of the entrance to the dam. A huge explosion smashed the hull near the stern in the engine room and hold number three. Water rushed into the disabled ship which listed to starboard and sank in less than 10 minutes. Of the 205 passengers and crew members, nine nurses, 42 member of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) and 79 crew drowned.

The English patrol boat HMS P-26 attempted to come alongside to assist, but also struck a mine and sank."

Ellen Foyster is commemorated on the Salta Memorial in Ste Marie Cemetery, Le Havre. This from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission:

"A memorial in Plot 62 marks the graves of 24 casualties from the hospital ship 'Salta' and her patrol boat, sunk by a mine on 10 April 1917. The memorial also commemorates by name the soldiers, nurses and merchant seamen lost from the 'Salta' whose bodies were not recovered, and those lost in the sinking of the hospital ship 'Galeka' (mined on 28 October 1916) and the transport ship 'Normandy' (torpedoed on 25 January 1918), whose graves are not known."

Memorial photograph courtesy of the Roll of Honour website.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Soldiers Died in The Great War
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 9 April 2010

13285 Pte William Mist, 9th Bn, Essex Regt

On the 9th April 1917, the opening day of the Battle of Arras, 4111 British Army officers and men lost their lives. The 9th Essex Regiment lost 41 men on that day, and Private William Mist of Sidcup in Kent was one of those men. He was living in Chertsey and living in London when he enlisted. His number dates to early September 1914 and his medal card - which gives the 11th Battalion - indicates that he had arrived overseas on the 30th August 1915.

William is buried in Feuchy Chapel British Cemetery at Wancourt in France. Wancourt was captured on the 12th April 1917 after heavy fighting.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 8 April 2010

G/4926 Pte Arthur Voice, 7th Bn, Royal Sussex Regt

G/4926 Private Arthur Voice of the 7th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, was killed in action on the 8th April 1916. He was a Sussex man, born in Newhaven and living in Brighton when he enlisted there on the 14th January 1915. He gave his address as 8 Bedford Building, Kemp Town, and his trade as "Indoor Porter". He was 19 years and six months old, five feet seven inches tall, and with good physical development. His father, William, is recorded as his next of kin.

Arthur was posted to the 3rd Battalion on the 21st January 1915 and then to the 7th Battalion on the 23rd June. He arrived in France the same day. He was posted missing on the 8th April 1916 and in March 1917 his death was accepted for official purposes.

Arthur Voice has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Wednesday, 7 April 2010

10730 Pte Alexander Trotter, 2nd Bn, KOYLI

10730 Private Alexander Trotter of the 2nd Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died on the 7th April 1915. He was 27 years old, the son of Susannah Campbell (formerly Trotter) of 8 Monk Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and the late Alexander Trotter. He was born at Hebburn, County Durham and enlisted at Jarrow.

Alexander was a regular, career soldier who enlisted around August or September 1912. He arrived in France on the 13th September 1914 and is buried in the Ramparts Cemetery, Lille Gate, at Ypres.

Soldiers Died in The Great War states that Alexander was killed in action, although his medal index card notes that he died of wounds.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tuesday, 6 April 2010

220394 Pte William Gladdis, 1st Bn, Royal Berkshire Regiment

Four hundred and eighty-nine British Army officers and men died on the 6th April 1918. 220394 Private William Gladdis of the 1st Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment, died in France on this day. He was a Hampshire man, born on the Isle of Wight and attesting there in December 1915. He was 19 years old and a licensed hawker by trade. He gave his address as 4 Castle Road, Cowes.

It wasn't until 16th March 1917 that William was called up. He initially joined a battalion of the Hampshire Regiment - number 243195 - transferred to the 1/5th Lincolnshire Regiment, and then transferred again to the Royal Berks in July 1917. He is buried in the Le Cateau Military Cemetery.

William's service record records that he was killed in action on the 23rd March 1918. This is at odds however, with the information on Soldiers Died in The Great War and The Commonwealth War Graves Commission and it is the latter which I am using as my reference.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Monday, 5 April 2010

10539 Pte Timothy Lowe, 1st Bn, Cheshire Regt

10539 Private Timothy Lowe of the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, died of wounds on the 5th April 1915. He was born in Cosley, Staffordshire and enlisted at Northwick in Cheshire. His number indicates that he enlisted as a career soldier with the Cheshire regiment around May or June 1914, and his medal index card records that he arrived overseas on the 26th October 1914. He was thus an Old Contemptible, qualifying for the 1914 Star and clasp. His service record has not survived.

Timothy Lowe is buried in Berlin's South-Western Cemetery, indicating that he almost certainly died in captivity in one of the many prison camps operating in Germany during the First World war. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission states:

"In 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Berlin South-Western was one of those chosen and in 1924-25, graves were brought into the cemetery from 146 burial grounds in eastern Germany. There are now 1,176 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the Commonwealth plot at Berlin South-Western Cemetery. The total includes special memorials to a number of casualties buried in other cemeteries in Germany whose graves could not be found."

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Sunday, 4 April 2010

240354 Pte Herbert Pearman, 1/5th Bn, Welsh Regt

240354 Private Herbert Pearman of the 1/5th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, died of wounds on the 4th April 1917. He was 19 years old, the son of Alfred and Bessie Pearman of 36 Park Street, Penrhiwceiber, Glamorgan. Soldiers Died in the Great War notes that Herbert was born at Llanwonno, was living at Penrhiwceiber, and enlisted at Mountain Ash. His original number with the 5th Welsh Regiment was 1566 which dates to around April 1912 (and means that unless the CWGC have recorded his age incorrectly, he was a very young 15-year-old when he joined up).

Herbert arrived overseas in the Balkans on the 9th August 1915. He is buried in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery in Egypt.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Saturday, 3 April 2010

18101 L/Cpl Walter Anderson, 15th Bn, Royal Scots

Edinburgh-born 18101 Lance-Corporal Walter Zerub Baillie Anderson of the 15th Battalion, Royal Scots, died of wounds at Number 8 Casualty Clearing Station, Bailleul on the 3rd April 1916. He was 28 years old, the son of the late Andrew Hislop Anderson, of 14 George Street, Edinburgh.

Walter came from a large family. Surviving papers in the WO 363 series at the National Archives indicate that in October 1919 he was survived by three brothers and seven sisters. Their ages in 1919 ranged from 44 to 27.

Walter enlisted at Edinburgh on the 3rd November 1914. He was a clothier by trade and was living with his father at George Street. He was five feet, six and a half inches tall, had a pale complexion, grey eyes and brown hair.

William Anderson and Sons Ltd was an established firm of "clothiers and military tailors" and still survives today as Kinloch Anderson. Information on a company brochure states, "Formerly William Anderson and Sons Ltd, and an independent company for over five generations, Kinloch Anderson has been known and respected for over a century in Scotland's Capital City, as makers and retailers of fine clothing and Highland Dress. Originally as civilian and military tailors, Kinloch Anderson developed a particular expertise in Tartans and Kiltmaking and tailored officers' uniforms for all the famous Scottish regiments."

Walter remained in Britain until the 7th January 1916, sailing for France the following day.

On the 10th April 1916, William Hislop Anderson, Walter's oldest brother, wrote to the Paymaster of the 15th Battalion, Royal Scots at The Hamilton Barracks in Hamilton. The letter was written on headed paper from the company's Glasgow office at 106 Hope Street. William wrote:

Dear Sir

A gentleman called on me today and informed me that my brother, lance-corporal W B Anderson, 18101 15th Royal Scots, had been struck by a bullet in the head and seriously wounded last Sunday night. As I have had no intimation of this from any other source I will be greatly obliged if you will let me know at the earliest moment possible if you have any information on the matter.

Thanking you in anticipation...

There is no reply amongst Walter's surviving papers but of course, at the time William was anxiously enquiring about his brother, Walter had already been dead for a week.

In December 1916, nine months after his death, Walter's personal effects were returned to William in Edinburgh. These are listed as: disc, letters, razor, brush, watch, photo, knife, pouch, notebook, purse, testament, mirror, pipe, torch-light, keys, writing case.

Walter Zerub Baillie Anderson is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord) in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, WO 363)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Friday, 2 April 2010

240167 Pte John Ogden, East Lancashire Regt

240107 Private John Ogdon of the 2/5th East Lancashire Regiment, died of wounds on the 2nd April 1918. He was born in Manchester and enlisted at Ramsbottom. He is buried in St Sever Cemetery Extension in Rouen.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Thursday, 1 April 2010

2633 Pte Harry Paul Hogg, 9th Bn, HLI

2633 Private Harry Paul Hogg of the 9th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, died of wounds on the 1st April 1915. He was 20 years old, the son of James and Mary Hogg, of Ellangowan, Bo'ness in Linlithgowshire.

Harry Hogg's number dates to early September 1914 and by 22nd January 1915 he was in France. He is buried in Lillers Communal Cemetery which, as the Commonwealth War Graves Commission points out, was "used for billets and headquarter offices from the autumn of 1914 to April 1918" and was the "hospital centre with the 6th, 9th, 18th, 32nd, 49th and 58th Casualty Clearing Stations in the town at one time or another."

Harry's service record no longer appears to survive, however there is a full biography in De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour from which the photo (above) is taken. I have reproduced the extract below. Click on it for a larger version.


The Herbert Bain mentioned above was 2636 Pte James Herbert Bain who later went on to be commissioned in the Seaforth Highlanders and appears to have survived the war. Harry Hogg is commemorated on the imposing Bo'ness War Memorial, and the images below are reproduced from the relevant page on the West Lothian Family History Society website.




At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry (MIC, De Ruvigny's)
Soldiers Died in The Great War
Army Service Numbers
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
My thanks to Janette Fowlds at the West Lothian Family History Society for the photographs of Bo'ness Memorial, and permission to use these.

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