Friday, 31 July 2009

A/200762 Rfm Henry Leonard Payton, 18th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps


A/200762 Rifleman Henry Leonard Payton of the 18th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, was one of 101 Other Rank KRRC servicemen to die on this day, 31st July, in 1917. He was killed in action.

Henry was born in late 1885 or early 1886, his birth registered in the March quarter of 1886 at Sudbury in Suffolk. The 1891 census records him, aged 5, living in Glemsford, Suffolk. The family address is the board school at Tye Green where his father, William H Payton (aged 35) was an elementary school teacher. Also in the household were Henry's mother, Mary A Payton (aged 34) and his siblings: Alice M M Payton (aged 10), Emily Payton (aged nine) and Culmer George Payton (aged four). William is recorded as having been born in Abingdon, Berkshire and his wife in Crayford, Kent. Alice and Emily were born in Erith (Kent) but the two boys have Glemsford recorded as their place of birth.

Ten years later, when the 1901 census was taken, the family was still at the board school in Glemsford, Alice noted as a student in a training college.

Soldiers Died in The Great War notes that Henry was born in Sudbury, Suffolk and enlisted at Leyton, Essex (now Greater London). It also notes that he had previously served with the Rifle Brigade (number S/20187) and with the 112th Training Reserve Battalion (number TR/13/38300). The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds no additional information other than that he is commemorated on panel 51 or 53 of the Menin Gate at Ypres.

Henry Payton's Rifle Brigade number dates to June 1916 and his KRRC number falls within the six figure A/ prefix series of numbers allocated to men who joined from the Training Reserve.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (BMD, MIC, 1891 and 1901 census)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
Menin Gate photo by Tim Bekaert, taken from Wikimedia Commons

Thursday, 30 July 2009

16447 Pte Joseph Michael Scarr, 9th Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

16447 Pte Joseph M Scarr of the 9th Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on 30th July 1916. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) records that he was the son of Joseph and Harriet Scarr of 23, Mark Street, Newtownards, Co. Down and that he was born at Downham Market, Norfolk. Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW) gives his place of birth as Dipton, County Durham, his place of residence as Blackhill, County Durham, and his place of enlistment as Consett (also County Durham).

The 1901 census records Joseph as a five year old boy living at 25 Benfieldside Road, Benfieldside, Durham. The head of the household is recorded as Joseph Scarr, a 38 year old widower working as a coal miner and then there are Joseph junior's siblings: Sabina M Scarr (aged 16), William T Scarr (aged 15 and also working as a coal miner) and Mary B Scarr aged 7. All the family members are recorded as having been born in Dipton.

CWGC records Joseph's age as 40 but this must be incorrect. The place of birth is also at odds with the information on SDGW and the 1901 census. A check through the birth registers reveals that Joseph's birth was registered at Durham in the March quarter of 1896.

Joseph's number indicates that he joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers in January 1915. However, he died before he even got to France and is buried at Edinburgh's Comely Bank Cemetery, grave reference D.7.

CWGC states that "during the First World War, Edinburgh was headquarters to the 4th, 5th, 6th and 9th Battalions of the Royal Scots, with the 7th Battalion at Leith. The 2nd Scottish General Hospital (1,000 beds) occupied Craigleith Poorhouse, the Edinburgh War Hospital (2,600 beds) was in the Asylum buildings at Bangour and the Leith War Hospital (585 beds) in the infirmary at Leith." There are 304 Commonwealth War Graves at Comely Bank.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (BMD, 1901 census)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Wednesday, 29 July 2009

2896 Pte Robert Wilson, 1/5th East Lancashire Regiment


2896 Pte Robert Wilson of the 1/5th East Lancashire Regiment, died of wounds on the 29th July 1915. Soldiers Died in The Great War notes tha he enlisted at Haslingden, Lancashire, whilst the Commonwealth war Graves Commission adds nothing further other than to record that he is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Robert's army service number indicates that he joined the 5th East Lancashire Regiment in October 1914. He may well have originally joined the 2/5th East Lancs and then transferred to the 1/5th. In any event, his medal index card shows that he arrived on the Gallipoli peninsular on 23rd July 1915 and died of wounds just six days later.

There is an impressive war memorial at Haslingden and also a memorial stained glass window in St Stephen's church which was unveiled in 1927. On a brass plaque close by are the names of 16 men of Haslingden who gave their lives for their King and Country, and presumably Robert Wilson's name is amongst these. He is certainly remembered by name on the memorial plaques at Haslingden Public Library.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
Helles Memorial photograph from Merrow Residents' Association

Tuesday, 28 July 2009

201135 Pte Herbert Arthur Bray, 7th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders

201135 Pte Herbert Arthur Bray of the 7th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, was killed in action on 28th July 1917.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) notes that he was 34 years old, the son of John William and Kate Elizabeth Bray of 55 St. Saviour's Road, West Croydon, and the husband of Mabel H. Bray of 5 Sundridge Road, Addiscombe, East Croydon, Surrey. He was serving with the 7th Battalion's A Company when he was killed.

I am uncertain when Herbert joined the Cameron Highlanders but his medal index card notes that he was only entitled to the British War and Victory medals which in turn means that he must have arrived overseas no earlier than the 1st January 1916. Soldiers Died in The Great War records that he was living in Croydon and enlisted in Croydon and this obviously ties in with the next of kin information sent to the CWGC after his death.

Herbert Bray has no known grave and is one of 54,896 commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Monday, 27 July 2009

26923 Pte Ferady Clayton, 9th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment

26923 Pte Ferady Clayton of the 9th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment, was killed in action on 27th July 1918.

He was called up - aged 18 years and 10 months - on 12th April 1916 and originally posted to the 3/5th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment (army service number 5198). His service record survives in the Burnt Documents series at the National Archives and shows that at the time of his attestation he was living at 20 North End, Stalybridge and working as a Cotton Operative. He gave his next of kin as his mother - Sarah Clayton - and his sister, Mrs Elizabeth Coates of 19 Fitzroy Street, Ashton-under-Lyne. Elsewhere in Ferady's service papers, his mother's address is noted as 143 Trafalgar Street, Ashton-under-Lyne.

With less than three months' service under his belt, Ferady sailed for France, embarking at Southampton on the 11th July 1916 and arriving at Rouen the following day. He moved to the 6th Infantry Base Depot at Rouen the same day and joined his battalion (5th South Lancs) in the Field, ten days later. He then remained with the battalion until 21st October 1917. By this date the Territorial Force had been re-numbered and Ferady had a new six digit number: 242443.

During his time with the 5th South Lancs, he was admitted to hospital with scabies and spent two weeks out of the line as a result.

Ferady received a gunshot wound to the second finger on his left hand on 20th September 1917 and after spending a month in the 3rd Australian General Hospital he was sent home to England aboard the Hospital Ship Jan Breydel. He was in the London Temperance Hospital from 21st October until 10th November 1917 and, after fully recuperating, was posted to the 3rd Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment on 20th December 1917.

After recuperating in Blighty, Private Clayton sailed again for France. He joined the 11th South Lancs in Rouen on 19th January 1918, was posted to the 7th South Lancs three days later, and was finally transferred and posted to the 9th Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment on 3rd April 1918. It was at this point that he was given his new number 26923. He joined his battalion in the Field on 6th April 1918 and was fatally wounded on 23rd July, dying at a casualty clearing station four days later. Presumably his next of kin were notified by telegram that he was seriously wounded.

Soldiers Died in The Great War records that Ferady Clayton died of wounds and in his file there is a telegram from the officer commanding number 29 Casualty Clearing Station in France stating that Ferady died as a result of gun shot wound to his abdomen.

There are some minor - trivial, with hindsight - misdemeanours recorded in Pt Clayton's file: improperly dressed on a parade in June 1916, over-staying his leave in January 1918, losing a wire-cutter in April 1918, and not complying with an order on 27th June 1918.

Ferady Clayton is buried at Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt. 1374 British servicemen from the First World War are buried there, the majority of whom died of wounds at the 3rd, 29th and 56th Casualty Clearing Stations.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC, Service Record in WO 363)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Sunday, 26 July 2009

Trench warfare, a severed link.


Harry Patch's death yesterday, marked not only the passing of Britain's oldest man, but also the passing of trench warfare from living memory to history. I never met Harry, but I met many of his WW1 contemporaries (my paternal grandfather and his brother amongst those) and I still feel very privileged to have done so. In fact it was my grandfather's death in 1980 that inspired me, at the age of 18, to go out and conduct interviews with the 1914-1918 generation; men I had never met before. I am now finally publishing those interviews on another blog - World War 1 Veterans.

But I remember, even as a young boy, playing in the farmer's fields close to where I lived, and jumping down into the ditches, pretending that they were trenches. And much later, when I sat down with my note book and my tape recorder and listened to the stories of the men who were really there, I was making up for the hours I never spent talking to my own grandfather about his time with the Royal Garrison Artillery. Later still, it was always with sadness that the news filtered down to me that another man I had met and spent pleasant hours with, had died suddenly, or passed away in hospital after a short illness. I attended some of their funerals and I remember taking a long solitary walk through the country lanes around Great Dunmow, Essex in January 1986 after the news came through that another 'favourite' of mine, Reginald Crane, had died suddenly in hospital, just after we all thought he'd recovered from the illness that had put him there in the first place.

Of course I knew that my time with these men was always going to be short-lived, but I enjoyed their company during the time that I had with them, and it was evident that many of them enjoyed my company too. Reg Crane (4th Berks) was a regular lunchtime drinking partner of mine at The Ship and The Compasses in Broomfield Road, Chelmsford and his old pals Bob Bailey (RAMC) and Daniel O'Sullivan (RFA) would also come along on occasions. Stan Brown (1st Leicesters & 2nd South Staffs) lived just around the corner in Tudor Avenue and every once in a while I'd drive over to Writtle and take Harry Bardsley (18th Manchesters) out to lunch at The Duck Inn at Newney Green. Wilf Wortley (5th Leicesters) in Loughborough gave me his Princess Mary tin which he'd kept in his garden shed for years, filled with old screws and nails. Bertie Murkin of the 1/5th Essex gave me books, and Freddie Cutts (Army Cyclist Corps) gave me a lot of his WW1 ephemera. Alone in an Abbeyfield House and with no living relatives, he was pleased to pass them on to somebody who was interested in the Great War.

But all the men I met, without fail, showed me a courtesy and a kindness that I often felt was lacking in my own generation and in British society as a whole. So when they died, it was both the men and what they stood for; the values they represented, that I mourned.

And so going back to Harry Patch, I do feel a sense of loss; the passing of that generation of men who found themselves either willingly (or later forcibly) uprooted from their familiar Edwardian Society and thrust into what many of the men I spoke to, simply described as "Hell". Harry never spoke about World War One until he was a hundred. Most of the men I interviewed had rarely spoken of the war either and I did meet a number of veterans who simply refused point blank to talk about it. Reg Crane fell into that category. All he would say about the Great War was, "We were glad to forget it."

I see on the BBC News that a National Service to commemorate the generation of 1914-1918 is to take place in Britain, probably at Westminster Abbey. It is fitting that this should be the case; a last opportunity for all of us to thank that blighted generation for the sacrifices they made.



The image on this post comes from the Government of Australia website and shows construction of the Menin Gate at Ypres, well under way. The names of 54,896 men who have no known grave are carved onto the gate's massive panels.

G/9315 Pte Gustav Alfred Lauritz Lowe, 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

G/9315 Pte Gustav Alfred Lauritz Lowe, who was born in Gothenburg, Sweden, was killed in action at Gallipoli on this day - 26th July - in 1915. Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW)notes his unit as the 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), which is incorrect. This was a Territorial Force battalion of the London Regiment, affiliated to the Royal Fusiliers. The regiment Gustav was serving with was the Royal Fusiliers and his number indicates that he joined the regiment in November 1914.

SDGW records that he was living in Poplar, London when he enlisted (also at Poplar). The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds nothing more substantial, only to record that Gustav is one of nearly 21,000 men named on the Helles Memorial. His medal index card records his first name as Gustaf and indicates that he arrived on the Gallipoli Peninsular on 16th June 1915.

Gustav was the only 2nd RF fatal casualty on the 26th July 1915 and, according to SDGW, one of only two Other Rank natives of Gothenburg, to die in the service of His Majesty's Army between 1914 and 1919.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Saturday, 25 July 2009

Harry Patch RIP


Harry Patch, the last British First World War veteran to have fought in the trenches, died this morning, Saturday 25th July 2009, at 8.50am.

BBC News - Obituary
Harry Patch on Wikipedia

Harry Patch RIP.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.


539 L/Cpl Frederick Clarence Doyle, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment


Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW) records that 491 British NCOs and men, and 36 officers died on this day, 25th July, in 1916. 525 men; the equivalent of half an infantry battalion. Even today, so long after the shattering events of 1914-1918, such First World War statistics are staggering.

539 L/Cpl Frederick Clarence Doyle of the 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment was one of these casualties, killed in action on this day. SDGW records that he was born in Sparkbrook, Birmingham and enlisted in Birmingham. His number indicates that he was an original member of the the 15th (Service) Battalion (2nd Birmingham) and probably joined up in mid September 1914.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records Frederick's number as 15/539 but adds no further information other than his place of burial: Danzig Alley British Cemetery, Mametz; grave reference I.A.3.

Frederick was 23 years old when he died. His birth was registered in Warwickshire in the December quarter of 1892 and he appears on the 1901 census living with his parents and siblings at 114 Grove Road, Yardley, Sparkhill. The household in 1901 comprised John W Doyle (head, aged 46, a solicitor's clerk), his wife Edith M Doyle (aged 35) and their four children: William J Doyle (aged 13), Edith C Doyle (aged 11), Frederick (aged 8) and Dorothy G Doyle aged 3. All the family members are recorded as having been born in Birmingham.

In 1891, when the previous census return had been taken, John Doyle and his family (with Frederick yet to arrive) had been living at Alfred Road, Yardley, and employed a servant. Edith Doyle's sister, Amy Hulse aged 12, was also at the family address.

The 15th (Service) Battalion, The Royal Warwickshire Regiment was raised by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham and a local committee in September 1914. On 5th October 1914 it moved to Sutton Coldfield and then, in June 1915, to Wensleydale as part of the 95th Brigade in the 32nd Division. In August it moved to Codford on Salisbury Plain befoire proceeding overseas, arriving in France on 21st November 1915. That's the date on Frederick's medal index card which also indicates that he was entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War and Victory Medals; medals he would never wear.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC, BMD, 1891 & 1901 census returns)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
British Regiments 1914-18 - Brig E A James OBE, TD

Birmingham Pals badge from the Terry Carter collection.

Friday, 24 July 2009

L/4804 Gnr Ernest Millward Stone, Royal Field Artillery

L/4804 Gunner Ernest Millward Stone of the Royal Field Artillery was killed in action on this day, 24th July, in 1917. According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, he was 22 years old, the son of Mr and Mrs S. Stone of 16 Clifton Street, Chesterfield, Derbyshire. He was serving with B Battery in the 153rd Brigade when he was killed. Soldiers Died in The Great War notes that he was born in Chesterfield and enlisted there.

Ernest's medal index card notes that he was entitled to the 1914-15 Star and the British War and Victory Medals. He arrived overseas on 26th November 1915. On the reverse of the card is the following note: "Mrs Stone makes application in respect of her son, the later Gnr E M Stone, 12.4.19" and then, "Reply on EF/a from Mrs Stone on 30.4.19". Mrs Stone's address is given as 52 Vincent Crescent, Brampton Moor, Chesterfield.

Ernest Stone is buried in White House Cemetery, Ypres; grave reference I.H.16.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Thursday, 23 July 2009

19940 Pte Alexander Grahamslaw, 7/8th King's Own Scottish Borderers

19940 Pte Alexander Grahamslaw of the 7/8th King's Own Scottish Borderers was killed in action on 23rd July 1918. Soldiers Died in The Great War records that he lived in Broughshaw, Antrim (now Northern Ireland) and enlisted at Ballymena, County Antrim. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds little, only that he is buried in Vauxbin French National Cemetery; grave reference I.C.3.

Alexander's army service number indicates that he joined the KOSB in May 1915 and his medal index card notes that he first arrived overseas on 25th November that year. The location 2b is recorded on his card, referring to Gallipoli. The 7/8th KOSB was not formed until June 1916 and so Alexander must have initially served in Gallipoli with another KOSB battalion.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Wednesday, 22 July 2009

Capt Noel Charles Boosey, 22nd London Regiment


Noel Charles Boosey of the 22nd (County of London) Regiment, died of wounds on 22nd July 1915. Soldiers Died in The Great War gives his rank as Lieutenant, whilst the Commonwealth war Graves Commission (CWGC) notes the rank of captain. CWGC additionally adds that he was 23 years old and the son of Arthur and Lucy A Boosey of "The Cedars," Bromley Common, Bromley in Kent.

Noel's birth was recorded in the December 1891 quarter in the Greater London (Kent) district. I am guessing that he was born around Christmas time, hence his christian name.

The 1901 census records Noel as a nine year old boarder at Hildersham House School, St Peter's Road, Broadstairs, Kent. The imposing sounding Harcourt C Snowden was the 56 year old proprietor, headmaster and Church of England clergyman. Noel's older brother, Leslie Arthur Boosey (aged 13) was also studying at the same school. The two boys' place of birth is recorded as Bromley in Kent. Leslie would also go on to serve with the 22nd London Regiment and would rise to the rank of Major. He would also survive the war.

Noel's medal index card indicates that he arrived in France on 12th March 1915. His 1914-15 Star is impressed with the rank of Lieutenant, whilst his British War and Victory Medals are impressed with the rank of Captain. The address given on the reverse of his card is the same one as recorded by CWGC with Mrs Boosey as the contact.

Noel Boosey is buried in the Choques Military Cememtery in France; grave reference I.B.19.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC, BMD, 1901 census)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

The photograph on this post shows Hildersham House School, long since demolished.

Tuesday, 21 July 2009

13312 L/Cpl George Arthur Burch, 1st Bn, Grenadier Guards

13312 L/Cpl George Arthur Burch of the 1st Bn, Grenadier Guards, was killed in action 21st July 1917; 92 years ago today. He was a native of Ipswich in Suffolk and, according to Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW) also enlisted there. SDGW records his full name (above) but The Commonwealth War Graves Commission simply records his name as George Burch.

George's service record does not appear to have survived, however his medal index card notes that he arrived in France on 6th October 1914 and his number indicates that he must have joined the Grenadier Guards in June 1907.

George was born in 1883, his birth registered in Suffolk in the March quarter of that year. He appears on the 1891 census, aged eight, the son of George Arthur and Emma Burch living at 20 Mount Street in Ipswich. George senior (aged 30) is recorded as a boot and shoe rivetter. Also living at the same address were George's siblings: Henry Burch (aged six), Emma Burch (aged four) and Nelly Burch (aged 2).

By the time the 1901 census was taken, George Burch senior had died in 1899 and Emma Burch (aged 37) is listed as a widow and the head of the family; a cardboard box maker by trade. The family was now living at 20 Tanner's Lane, Ipswich and apart from Emma comprised George (aged 18, a grocer's porter), Henry (aged 16, a leather slipper maker, recorded as Harry on the 1901 census), Emma (aged 14, a factory hand), Nellie (spelled Nellie this time, aged 12) and a more recent arrival, Ethel Burch (aged six). It must have been a hard life and it may have been one of the reasons why, a few years later, George decided to sign up for a career in the British Army.

George Arthur Burch is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery; grave reference I.F.4.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC, BMD, 1891 and 1901 census)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Monday, 20 July 2009

7933 Sgt Arthur Ager, 10th Battalion, Essex Regiment

7933 Sgt Arthur Ager of the 10th Battalion, Essex Regiment, was killed in action on this day, 20th July, in 1916. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was 29 years old and the husband of Rose Gildon (formerly Ager) of 23 Sugar Well Road, Meanwood, Leeds. Soldiers Died in The Great War adds the additional information that Arthur was born in Hatfield Peverel, Essex, enlisted at Warley, Essex and was a resident of Leeds.

I had surmised that Arthur Ager was a regular soldier and subsequent information from a poster on the Great War Forum has proved that to be the case. His number does not belong to the series being issued to Kitchener Battalions, nor does it belong to the series in use by the 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion or the Territorial Force battalions. The only series it could have belonged belong to is that which was being used by the regular battalions and it indicates that Arthur originally joined up between 27th May and 3rd June 1904.

The Essex Regiment Gazette notes that he was promoted corporal on 5th April 1911 whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, and he was transferred to the reserve (still a corporal) on 30th June 1911. He was possibly posted straight to the 10th Essex when it was formed in September 1916. There is book With the 10th Essex in France which might mention Sergeant Ager and which would certainly give more detail about the action in which he was killed. He is however, mentioned by name on page 171 of Burrows' history of the 10th Essex where he is described as the Lewis Gun Senior NCO.

Arthur's medal index card records that he he arrived in France on 25th July 1915. He buried in Delville Wood Cemetery; grave reference XXXII.C.10.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
The Great War Forum (my thanks to Clive and Ali for responding to my enquiry there)





Sunday, 19 July 2009

10274 Pte James Escott Palmer, 6th Somerset Light Infantry

10274 Pte James Escott Palmer of the 6th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, was killed in action on this day, 19th July, 1915. He was 33 years old.

Soldiers Died in The Great War notes that he was born in Bishopstone Bristol, and enlisted at Bristol. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of James Escott Palmer of Bristol.

James was an original member of the 6th Battalion, enlisting in August 1914. His medal index card indicates that he arrived in France on 21st May 1915 which was when the battalion arrived there en masse.

James is buried in Enclosure No 2 at Bedford House Cemetery Ypres; grave reference: VI.A.12.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Saturday, 18 July 2009

Henry Allingham RIP


Henry Allingham, the world's oldest man, and a veteran of the First World War, died yesterday at the age of 113.

Henry Allingham, RIP.

St Dunstans's - obituary
BBC News - obituary
Henry Allingham on Wikipedia

Portrait from portraits.co.uk

65482 Pte John Frederick Irwin, 15th Bn, Cheshire Regiment

Twenty year old 65482 Pte John Frederick Irwin of the 15th Cheshire Regiment died of wounds on this day, 18th July, in 1918. Soldiers Died in The Great War notes that he had previously served with the Cheshire Yeomanry (number 210465).

He is buried in Esquelbecq Military Cemetery and is commemorated fully on John Hartley's excellent Stockport 1914-1918 website.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (BMD, MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
More Than A Name - Stockport 1914-1918

Friday, 17 July 2009

3363 Pte Eric Raymond Cornall, 1/4th Gloucestershire Regiment

3363 Pte Eric Raymond Cornall of the 1/4th Gloucestershire Regiment was killed on this day, 17th July, in 1916. The 1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, was a Territorial Force battalion, and Eric's number indicates that he must have joined it on about the 10th or 11th November 1914. His medal index card (MIC) adds the initials T. R. after his number, presumably standing for 'Territorial'.

According to his MIC, Eric landed in France on 31st March 1915, having presumably been turned from a raw recruit into a Gloucestershire Regiment infantryman in under five months.

Soldiers Died in the Great War does not note a place of birth, but it gives his place of residence as Sheffield, and his place of enlistment as Bristol. There is an Eric Raymond Cornall birth registered in London in the March quarter of 1893 which, if it's the same man - as seems likely - would have made Eric 23 years old when he was killed.

Eric Cornall has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial in France.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (BMD, MIC)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Thursday, 16 July 2009

20581 Col Sgt Percival Rose, Loyal North Lancashire Regt

20581 Col Sgt Percival Rose of the Loyal North Lancashire Regt, died at home on this day, 16th July, 1915. According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) he was the husband of Florence Mable Rose of 7 North Terrace, Carlisle.

Soldiers Died in The Great War records that he was born in India and enlisted at Preston. He is buried at Preston New Hall Lane Cemetery; grave reference T.CE.102.

The fact that Percival was born in India and that he was a colour sergeant at the time of his death, suggests to me that he was possibly born into a military family and almost certainly had prior military experience himself. I'm guessing he had seen service with the regular army and had then been discharged, volunteering in 1915 and then serving in possibly an administrative / training role with the Loyal North Lancs Regiment. This is all pure supposition on my part however. Certainly he does not appear to have served overseas prior to joining the Loyal North Lancs as there appears to be no medal index card in his name. His Loyal North Lancs army service number suggests that he joined the regiment in April 1915.

CWGC notes that Percival was 36 years old when he died. He had married Florence Mabel Farish in 1908 (registered at Carlisle in the June quarter of that year) but I have been unable to locate him on any of the census returns and it's possible that he was in India when these were taken.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (BMD)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Wednesday, 15 July 2009

G/17827 Pte Henry Robert List, 16th Middlesex Regiment

East Londoner Henry Robert List was killed in action on this day, 15th July, in 1917. Soldiers Died in The Great War records that he was born in Canning Town, and living in Canning Town when he enlisted there. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of Mr and Mrs List of 56 Blanche Street, Hermit Road, Plaistow, London. He was 23 years old when he died.

Henry's army number tells us that he enlisted for wartime service only (G/ prefix) and that he joined up in the second half of August 1915. His medal index card confirms that he must have arrived overseas on or after 1st January 1916.

Henry is buried at Canada Farm Cemetery near Ypres, Belgium. His grave reference is I.D.14.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Tuesday, 14 July 2009

204840 Pte Albert Edward Punt, 2nd Devonshire Regiment

204840 Pte Albert Edward Punt of the 2nd Devonshire Regiment, was killed in action on this day, 14th July 1918. He was 21 years old and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) records the additional information that he was the son of Mr and Mrs. Walter Punt of 71 Windmill Rd, West Croydon, Surrey. It also notes that he was born at Thornton Heath.

Soldiers Died in The Great War notes notes that Albert Punt enlisted in London and his medal index card (MIC) records two numbers: the Devonshire regiment noted above and also a number for the 21st London Regiment - 653632.

Working from my database on army service numbers, I see that 653632 would have been issued to a man joining the 21st Londons between October and December 1916. Albert would have been about 19 then and so it seems reasonable to assume that he was called up on or close to his 19th birthday. There is a birth registered for an Albert Edward Punt in Croydon in the June 1897 quarter for Croydon, and given that CWGC states that he was born at Thornton Heath, this must be the same person. I also looked for Albert on the 1901 census but have been unable to find him.

Albert must have set foot in France with the 21st London Regiment because, as I say, this number appears on his MIC. He obviously then transferred to the Devonshire Regiment.

Albert is buried in the Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension; grave reference V.E.10.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card, BMD registers)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Monday, 13 July 2009

Z/1120 Rfm Herbert Augustus Glenn, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade

Z/1120 Rifleman Herbert August Glenn was killed in action on 13th July 1916. His number, prefixed with the letter Z/, indicates that he enlisted as a Special Reservist for either one year year or three years' short service. Herbert Glenn probably joined up around the first week of September 1914, although it's difficult to be precise.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) notes that he was the son of John and Florence Glenn of 8 Kent St, Birmingham, and Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW) records that he was born in Birmingham, living in Birmingham and enlisted in Birmingham. The 1901 census shows Herbert living at New Street Courtyard, Birmingham with his parents and his sister Maude, aged two years old.

After training in the UK, it would appear that Herbert was sent as part of a draft to a Rifle Brigade battalion serving overseas. According to his medal index card (MIC), he arrived in France on 3rd February 1915 and was therefore entitled to receive the 1914-15 Star and British War and Victory medals.

Herbert Glenn was 20 years old when he was killed. He is buried in Vermelles British Cemetery; grave reference IV.G.26.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card, 1901 census)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Sunday, 12 July 2009

15356 Private George Leslie Ferrey, 2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment

15356 Private George Leslie Ferrey of the 2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, died on this day, 12th July, 1915. Soldiers Died in the Great War (SDGW) records the information that he was born in Christchurch, Hampshire and that his place of residence was recorded as Christchurch when he joined up at Brockenhurst. Judging by his army service number, that joining date was probably on or close to the 25th January 1915.

According to his medal index card (MIC), George arrived overseas in the Balkans on 15th June 1915. The 2nd Battalion had been at Cape Helles, Gallipoli since 25th April that year and would remain there until January the following year. George though, would die in Malta, probably in a hospital or convalescent depot, and probably as the result of disease. His MIC notes "died" and so does SDGW (as opposed to "died of wounds" for instance). He is buried in Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta (grave reference B.I.6) and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission additionally notes that he was the son of George Henry and Ellen Ferrey of "Mayfield," 21 Barrack Rd, Christchurch, Hants. He was 35 years old and had been serving with Z Company of the 2nd Hampshires.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
The Long, Long Trail

Saturday, 11 July 2009

G/9735 L/Cpl William Harry Shillito, 6th East Kent Regiment

G/9735 L/Cpl William Harry Shillito of the 6th Battalion, The Buffs, was killed in action on this day, 11th July, in 1917. His medal index card (MIC) and Soldiers Died in the Great War (SDGW) both incorrectly record his name as SHILLITS.

William was born in 1896, his birth registered at Dover in the December quarter of that year. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he was the son of Son of Mr and Mrs D H Shillito of 26 Balfour Road, Dover and SDGW records that he was living in Dover when he enlisted there. His army service number indicates that he must have joined the Buffs around 24th March 1916.

William has no known grave and is commemorated on Bay 2 of the Arras Memorial. He was 20 years old when he died.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card, BMD registers)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Friday, 10 July 2009

6328 Pte Edgar Victor Burchell, 1st Hampshire Regiment

6328 Pte Edgar Victor Burchell of the 1st Hampshire Regiment died of wounds on this day, 10th July, 1915. According to Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW), he was borne in Calne, Wiltshire; was living at Landport, Hampshire, and enlisted at Portsmouth.

Edgar Burchell was an old soldier. His number indicates that he joined the Hampshire Regiment in the second half of 1901 and it would appear that he extended his period of service with the regiment. Certainly he was in France by 31st August 1914 and was therefore entitled to the 1914 Star with clasp and roses, all of which are duly noted on his medal index card (MIC).

Edgar was 36 years old when he died. He was born around 1880 and appears on the 1881 census as a one year old infant with one older brother - Alfred E Burchell - aged 5. The boys' parents are recorded as Edgar Burchell (head, aged 25) and Elizabeth Burchell, a dressmaker, also aged 25. Edgar's occupation is noted as "Warder, Convicts Prison & Boot Maker." His place of birth is recorded as Calne, Wiltshire, as is Alfred's. Edgar's place of birth however, is recorded as Portsmouth. This ties in with Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) information but not that on SDGW. The boys' mother was born at Littlehampton in Sussex.

By the time the 1891 census was taken, the family, living at Marden Court in Calne, had grown considerably. Elizabeth Burchell (aged 35) is now recorded as the head (but still married rather than widowed) and then, in age order are her children: Edgar (aged 11), Emily M (aged 8), Albert Howard H Burchell (aged 6), Beatrice (aged 5), Robert (aged 3) and Frances E (aged 1).

Ten years on again and a 22 year old Edgar Burchell, just a few months off from joining the Hampshire Regiment, is recorded as a Navy crew member on a ship in Gibraltar. He is noted as "single" and a "Domestic, 2nd Class."

I don't have access to the 1911 census but in the June quarter of 1912, Edgar married Alice Newman in Portsmouth.

Edgar is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery and CWGC additionally notes that he was the "son of Edgar Micah Burchell and Elizabeth Ann Burchell and the husband of Alice Burchell of 5 Regent Street, Mile End, Portsmouth. Native of Portsmouth." There is also a note on his MIC that there was an "app[lication] from A Burchell [his wife] for 1914 Star in respect of the services of the late Pte E V Burchell 12.06.19." Mrs Burchell's address in 1919 is written as 6 Orchard Road, East Cowes.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card, 1881, 1891 & 1901 census, BMD registers)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Thursday, 9 July 2009

2nd Lt Dermot Jepson Henry, 5th Royal Irish Fusiliers

2nd Lt Dermot Jepson Henry of the 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, was killed in action on 9th July 1917. Soldiers Died in the Great War records his middle name as Jepson (this spelling also appearing on his medal index card), whereas The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) spells the name Jepsen.

At the time of his death, at the age of 24, he was attached to the 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers and CWGC records that he was the son of James and May Jepsen Henry, of Swan Park, Monaghan. This address also appears on the reverse of his medal index card which records that Dermot first arrived in France on 9th March 1916.

Dermot Henry is buried in Crump Trench British Cemetery, Fampoux; grave reference I.C.29.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.
Sources:

Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Wednesday, 8 July 2009

76067 Pte Victor Henry Cowmeadow, Derbyshire Yeomanry

I have been unable to find a medal index card for Victor Henry Cowmeadow. Soldiers Died in the Great War gives his number with the Derbyshire Yeomanry as 76067. This number belongs to the five digit series which was issued when the Territorial Force was re-numbered in early 1917.

Victor was born in Salisbury and living in Salisbury when he enlisted there. He died on this day, 8th July, 1918 whilst serving with the 1/1st Derbyshire Yeomanry. He is buried in Mikra British Cemetery, Kalamaria; grave reference: 266. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records his age as 21 and notes that he was the son of Frederick James and Catherine Eliza Cowmeadow of 70 St Ann Street, Salisbury.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.
 Sources:
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Tuesday, 7 July 2009

7980 Pte George John Albrecht, 8th Royal Fusiliers

Soldiers Died in the Great War notes that 2140 men died on 7th July 1916 and George John Albrecht was one of these.

There is conflicting information regarding George's military service. Soldiers Died in the Great War records his number as 7980 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London) Regiment. This cannot possibly be correct because 0nly the 1st four (City of London) battalions of the London Regiment were affiliated to the Royal Fusiliers and the 8th Battalion was the Post Office Rifles.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records George's battalion as 8th Royal Fusiliers but it is his medal index card which records the vital information. It notes two numbers for him: SR/7980 and 7980 and also records the fact that he entered the Balkans on 25th September 1915.

The SR/ prefix, denoting Special Reserve, effectively rules out all of the London Regiment battalion which, being Territorial Force formations, had no Special Reserve. That leaves two possibilities for the Royal Fusiliers - either the 5th (Special Reserve) Battalion, which would have issued number 7980 around the beginning of June 1908 or the 7th (Extra Reserve) Battalion which would have issued the same number in early 1913.

SDGW notes that George was born in Lambeth, was living at Vauxhall (both of these places in south London) and enlisted at Finsbury (north London). The 1901 census, in turn, reveals one George J Albrecht, aged eight, born in Lambeth and living in Lambeth. The household comprised George M Albrecht (head, aged 37, a tile cutter), his wife Mary A Albrecht (aged 32) and their five children: George (aged 8), Mary A Albrecht (aged 6) William A Albrecht (aged 5), Edward S W Albrecht (aged 3), and Frederick A B Albrecht (aged 1). All the children, and their parents were born in Lambeth.

George' age in 1901 rules out 1908 as a year of enlistment which, by default, means that he must have joined up with the 7th (Extra Reserve) Battalion in early 1913. This battalion was also located in Finsbury which is where (as Soldiers Died tells us) George enlisted.

When Britain went to war the following year, George must have been posted to another battalion of the Royal Fusiliers and then sailed for the Balkans. The 7th Battalion did go overseas - but not until July 1916 - and the 8th Battalion - with which he was killed - did not go to the Balkans. It arrived in France in May 1915 and stayed there until it was disbanded in February 1918.

George has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card, 1901 census)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War
The Long, Long Trail

Monday, 6 July 2009

L/13163 Pte John Francis Friday, 3rd East Surrey Regiment

Seven months after the Armistice was declared, L/13163 Pte John Friday of the 3rd East Surrey Regiment, died at home in Gillingham, Kent; on this day 6th July, 1919.

Soldiers Died in The Great War notes that he was born in Gillingham and that he enlisted in Lille, France. It also records the fact that he had previously served with the Middlesex Regiment where he had the number 62089. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission additionally notes that he was 21 years old, the son of John Thomas and Laura Ann Friday, of 7 Danes Hill, Gillingham.

John Friday's medal index card at the National Archives also indicates two other army service numbers: 21684 with the East Surrey Regiment and 51325 with the Manchester Regiment. 21684 looks to date to around June 1916 and 51325 is the following year, between March and July 1917.

My data for enlistments into the Middlesex Regiment, particularly late on in the war, is not as complete as it is for other regiments. However, it looks as though he joined the Middlesex regiment in 1918 and then transferred for a third time, back to the East Surrey Regiment. The L/ prefix for the East Surrey number indicates an enlistment for regular terms of service - seven years with the Colours and five on the Reserve.

John Friday is buried in Gillingham (Woodlands) Cemetery; grave ref: H 320.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Sunday, 5 July 2009

G/18011 Pte Frederick Wilbur Cannon, 13th Royal Sussex Regt

G/18011 Pte Frederick Wilbur Cannon of the 13th Royal Sussex Regiment died on 5th July 1918. Soldiers Died in The Great War - which incorrectly records his middle names Wilbar - notes that he "died" on this date, as opposed to be killed in action or dying of wounds.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, he was 29 years old, the son of Mrs Mary Ann Cannon, of 37, Station Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex. He is buried in the Sedan (St Charles) Communal Cemetery; grave reference 306.

Although Frederick's First World War service record does not appear to have survived, it's possible to make an educated guess about some of his service from his one surviving document - his medal index card. This records two numbers: 3281 and G/18011. The first number almost certainly belongs to the series used by the 2/5th Royal Sussex Regiment and would have been issued in the first half of 1915. Frederick, and other 2/5th Royal Sussex men were then transferred - whilst overseas in France - to the 13th Battalion. This transfer took place on 1st September 1916. It's also clear that Frederick did not go overseas until 1st January 1916 at the earliest, because his medal index card only notes entitlement to the British War and Victory medals.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great War

Saturday, 4 July 2009

2667 Pte George Stephen Idle, 15th London Regiment

2667 Pte George Stephen Idle of the 15th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles), died of wounds on 4th July 1916.

George was born in Battersea, south London in 1892. He was the son of George and Mary Idle and appears on the 1901 census living at 30 Eccles Road, Battersea. The household comprised George W Idle (head, aged 45, a linen goods manufacturer), his wife Mary M [sic] Idle (aged 46) and their seven offspring. In age order they were: Lilian Mary Idle (bookkeeper, aged 19), Ethel Muriel Idle (shirt seamstress, recorded as 19 but probably aged 16), Rose F Idle (aged 14), Arthur Wilberforce Idle (recorded as aged 6 but probably aged 11), George (aged 9), and Wilfred Bruce Idle (aged 6).

George's number indicates that he joined the 15th Londons on about the 1st September 1914 and he arrived in France on St Patrick's Day, 17th March 1915.

I'm not sure when George was wounded, but he was obviously returned to the UK and probably died of wounds at his home. He is buried in Croydon (Mitcham Road) Cemetery; grave reference C5 8936. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records the additional information that he was the son of George Washington Idle and Mary Elizabeth Idle, of 43, Dagnall Park, South Norwood, London.

George's two brothers also served their King and Country during the First World War. Wilfred served with the Royal Army Medical Corps and Arthur with the 5th London Regiment. His number (9882) indicates that he joined up almost as soon as war was declared. After a short period of training he was sent to France, landing there on 4th November 1914. He was killed in action on 28th March 1918 and is commemorated on bay 9 of the Arras Memorial.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (1901 census, FreeBMD, Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great war 1914-1919

Friday, 3 July 2009

20611 Gunner Samuel John Meyrick, RGA

20611 Gunner Samuel John Meyrick was killed in action on 3rd July 1917. According to Soldiers Died in the Great War, he was born at Knighton, Radnorshire and was living at Bucknell in Staffordshire when he enlisted. This is probably an error. There is a Bucknall in Staffordshire but a Bucknell in Shropshire. This latter location would appear to tie in more with Samuel's place of birth and I assuming this is where he was living.

The FreeBMD Birth Index 1837-1915 on Ancestry, indicates that Samuel Meyrick's birth was registered at Knighton in the first quarter of 1886.

Samuel's medal index card indicates that he was entitled to the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He arrived in France on 25th September 1914 and, as an 'Old Contemptible' he would also have been entitled to receive the clasp for his 1914 Star. His army service number additionally indicates that he'd been in the army for some while and had joined up between June and August 1904. He enlisted at Devizes in Wiltshire.

Unless he enlisted for a period of 12 years with the Colours (Long Service), his terms of enlistment in 1904 would have been three years with the Colours and nine years on the Reserve. So unless he'd actually extended his period of service between 1904 and 1907, Samuel Meyrick would have been on the reserve for around seven years when war was declared. Given his arrival date in France some seven weeks after war was declared, I think he probably was a reservist.

Samuel is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery; grave ref IV.D.19 and The Commonwealth War Graves Commission additionally notes that he was serving with the 6th Siege Battery.

Although he was born in Knighton, Samuel Meyrick's name does not appear on the town war memorial. It's possible that he is included on the war memorial in Bucknell and a memorial hall was built in the village after the 1914-1918 War.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

Sources:
Ancestry.co.uk (FreeBMD, Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great war 1914-1919

Thursday, 2 July 2009

S/8122 Pte David Carnie, 9th Seaforth Highlanders

S/8122 Private David Carnie of the 9th Seaforth Highlanders was killed in action on 2nd July 1915. Soldiers Died in the Great war 1914-1919 notes that he was living at Barony, Lanarkshire and that he had previously served with the Cameron Highlanders where his number was 10577.

10577 for the Cameron Highlanders indicates a joining date of late August 1914 whereas the Seaforths number dates to April/May 1915. David Carnie's medal index card records both service numbers and indicates that he arrived in France on 10th May 1915. It seems likely therefore that very shortly after arrival in France, he transferred to the Seaforth Highlanders and was given his new number.

David Carnie is buried in Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L'Avoue; grave reference II.E.18. His army service record does not appear to have survived.

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.
Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great war 1914-1919

Wednesday, 1 July 2009

10923 Private Thomas Anglesea, 15th Lancashire Fusiliers

Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW) states that Thomas Anglesea was born in Salford, Lancashire. I think however, that he is the same man recorded on the 1901 census as being born in Pendleton. The return, taken at 158 Robert Hall Street, Salford notes a 21 year old Thomas Anglesea living with his parents and working as a coal heaver. His age in 1901 certainly ties in with the information on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) website which records him as being 37 years old in July 1916.

Thomas was living in Salford when he enlisted with the Lancashire Fusiliers. He was given the number 10923 which indicates that he joined the regiment on about 13th October 1914. His number falls within the series used by the 15th (Service) Battalion, and indeed, that is the information given by SDGW. CWGC additionally notes that he was serving with D Company.

Thomas remained in England for over a year and it wasn't until 23rd November 1915 that he arrived in France. This meant that he was entitled to the 1914-15 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

On 1st July 1916, the 15th Lancashire Fusiliers attacked the German positions from the sunken lane at Beaumont Hamel and came under heavy machine gun fire. The battalion lost 268 men that day and Thomas Anglesea was one of those killed. Unlike so many, his body was recovered and he is buried in Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval; grave reference I.B.15. CWGC notes that he was the "husband of A. E. Anglesea, of 11, Eldon St., Tatton St., Salford, Manchester."

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.
Sources:
Ancestry.co.uk (1901 Census, Medal index card)
Army Service Numbers 1881-1918
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Soldiers Died in the Great war 1914-1919
Somme Battlefields

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